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September 17, 2011: Occupy without Counting

Chapter


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Abstract


  • The events of September 2011 will probably go down in history in much

    the same way as the events of May 1968, with no-one being able to decide

    what, if anything, actually happened.1 Zuccotti Park in New York City

    briefly flickered in the global consciousness as the spark that threatened

    to ignite a global revolution, just as the Latin Quarter of Paris had four

    decades earlier (Buchanan 2008: 7–12). Within a month over 150

    Occupy events were taking place all over the world and as one expects

    these days the movement was even more prominently and diversely

    represented on the internet. The message the occupiers wanted to relay

    was both simple and complex. ‘We are the 99%,’ they said: the part that

    in Rancière’s terms effectively has no part because the other 1% control a

    profoundly disproportionate share of national – global – wealth (the top

    1% in the US have a greater net worth than the bottom 90%), (Rancière

    1999: 9). They demanded nothing except to be noticed.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Buchanan, I. M. (2015). September 17, 2011: Occupy without Counting. In A. Conio (Eds.), Occupy: A People Yet to Come (pp. 191-202). London: Open Humanities Press. http://openhumanitiespress.org/occupy-a-people-yet-to-come.html

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3219&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/2211

Book Title


  • Occupy: A People Yet to Come

Start Page


  • 191

End Page


  • 202

Place Of Publication


  • http://openhumanitiespress.org/occupy-a-people-yet-to-come.html

Abstract


  • The events of September 2011 will probably go down in history in much

    the same way as the events of May 1968, with no-one being able to decide

    what, if anything, actually happened.1 Zuccotti Park in New York City

    briefly flickered in the global consciousness as the spark that threatened

    to ignite a global revolution, just as the Latin Quarter of Paris had four

    decades earlier (Buchanan 2008: 7–12). Within a month over 150

    Occupy events were taking place all over the world and as one expects

    these days the movement was even more prominently and diversely

    represented on the internet. The message the occupiers wanted to relay

    was both simple and complex. ‘We are the 99%,’ they said: the part that

    in Rancière’s terms effectively has no part because the other 1% control a

    profoundly disproportionate share of national – global – wealth (the top

    1% in the US have a greater net worth than the bottom 90%), (Rancière

    1999: 9). They demanded nothing except to be noticed.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Buchanan, I. M. (2015). September 17, 2011: Occupy without Counting. In A. Conio (Eds.), Occupy: A People Yet to Come (pp. 191-202). London: Open Humanities Press. http://openhumanitiespress.org/occupy-a-people-yet-to-come.html

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3219&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/2211

Book Title


  • Occupy: A People Yet to Come

Start Page


  • 191

End Page


  • 202

Place Of Publication


  • http://openhumanitiespress.org/occupy-a-people-yet-to-come.html