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Biopolitics and Memory in Postcolonial Literature and Culture

Book


Abstract


  • From the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa to the United Nations Permanent Memorial to the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, many worthwhile processes of public memory have been enacted on the national and international levels. But how do these extant practices of memory function to precipitate justice and recompense? Are there moments when such techniques, performances, and displays of memory serve to obscure and elide aspects of the history of colonial governmentality? This collection addresses these and other questions in essays that take up the varied legacies, continuities, modes of memorialization, and poetics of remaking that attend colonial governmentality in spaces as varied as the Maghreb and the Solomon Islands. Highlighting the continued injustices arising from a process whose aftermath is far from settled, the contributors examine works by twentieth-century authors representing Asia, Africa, North America, Latin America, Australia, and Europe. Imperial practices throughout the world have fomented a veritable culture of memory. The essays in this volume show how the legacy of colonialism’s attempt to transform the mode of life of colonized peoples has been central to the largely unequal phenomenon of globalization.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Griffiths, M. R., ed. Biopolitics and Memory in Postcolonial Literature and Culture. Surrey, United Kingdom: Ashgate, 2016. https://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&title_id=1219172893&edition_id=1219187591&calcTitle=1

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781472449986

Place Of Publication


  • Surrey, United Kingdom

Abstract


  • From the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa to the United Nations Permanent Memorial to the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, many worthwhile processes of public memory have been enacted on the national and international levels. But how do these extant practices of memory function to precipitate justice and recompense? Are there moments when such techniques, performances, and displays of memory serve to obscure and elide aspects of the history of colonial governmentality? This collection addresses these and other questions in essays that take up the varied legacies, continuities, modes of memorialization, and poetics of remaking that attend colonial governmentality in spaces as varied as the Maghreb and the Solomon Islands. Highlighting the continued injustices arising from a process whose aftermath is far from settled, the contributors examine works by twentieth-century authors representing Asia, Africa, North America, Latin America, Australia, and Europe. Imperial practices throughout the world have fomented a veritable culture of memory. The essays in this volume show how the legacy of colonialism’s attempt to transform the mode of life of colonized peoples has been central to the largely unequal phenomenon of globalization.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Griffiths, M. R., ed. Biopolitics and Memory in Postcolonial Literature and Culture. Surrey, United Kingdom: Ashgate, 2016. https://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&title_id=1219172893&edition_id=1219187591&calcTitle=1

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781472449986

Place Of Publication


  • Surrey, United Kingdom