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Unintended effects of planning in goal striving: substitution and amplification

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Abstract


  • When striving toward goals (e.g., lose five pounds, increase savings), people often run into problems with getting started, staying the course, or both. Even with strong goal intentions, initiating and persisting in goal striving is problematic (Armitage & Conner, 2001). Goal intentions are translated into goal striving behaviors via self-regulatory processes that mediate the intention-behavior relationship. Planning one’s goal pursuit in an “if-then” format (e.g., if I eat lunch in the cafeteria, I will order a salad) conserves self-regulatory strength and resources (e.g., Martijn et al., 2008), enhances goal attainment (e.g., Gollwitzer & Sheeran, 2006), and is helpful in both initiating (Brandstätter, Lengfelder, & Gollwitzer, 2001; Chasteen, Park, & Schwarz, 2001) and persisting (Achtziger, Gollwitzer, & Sheeran, 2008; Bayer, Gollwitzer, & Achtziger, 2010) in goal striving behaviors.

Authors


  •   Spanjol, Jelena (external author)
  •   Rosa, José Antonio. (external author)
  •   Tam, Leona

Editors


  •   Schmitt, Bernd (external editor)
  •   Lee, L (external editor)

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Tam, L., Spanjol, J. & Rosa, J. Antonio. (2015). Unintended effects of planning in goal striving: substitution and amplification. In B. Schmitt & L. Lee (Eds.), The Psychology of the Asian Consumer (pp. 33-39). United Kingdom: Routledge.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1787&context=buspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/buspapers/783

Book Title


  • The Psychology of the Asian Consumer

Start Page


  • 33

End Page


  • 39

Abstract


  • When striving toward goals (e.g., lose five pounds, increase savings), people often run into problems with getting started, staying the course, or both. Even with strong goal intentions, initiating and persisting in goal striving is problematic (Armitage & Conner, 2001). Goal intentions are translated into goal striving behaviors via self-regulatory processes that mediate the intention-behavior relationship. Planning one’s goal pursuit in an “if-then” format (e.g., if I eat lunch in the cafeteria, I will order a salad) conserves self-regulatory strength and resources (e.g., Martijn et al., 2008), enhances goal attainment (e.g., Gollwitzer & Sheeran, 2006), and is helpful in both initiating (Brandstätter, Lengfelder, & Gollwitzer, 2001; Chasteen, Park, & Schwarz, 2001) and persisting (Achtziger, Gollwitzer, & Sheeran, 2008; Bayer, Gollwitzer, & Achtziger, 2010) in goal striving behaviors.

Authors


  •   Spanjol, Jelena (external author)
  •   Rosa, José Antonio. (external author)
  •   Tam, Leona

Editors


  •   Schmitt, Bernd (external editor)
  •   Lee, L (external editor)

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Tam, L., Spanjol, J. & Rosa, J. Antonio. (2015). Unintended effects of planning in goal striving: substitution and amplification. In B. Schmitt & L. Lee (Eds.), The Psychology of the Asian Consumer (pp. 33-39). United Kingdom: Routledge.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1787&context=buspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/buspapers/783

Book Title


  • The Psychology of the Asian Consumer

Start Page


  • 33

End Page


  • 39