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A preliminary multiple case report of neurocognitive training for children with AD/HD in China

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • This preliminary multiple case study examined the behavioral outcomes of neurocognitive training on children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) in China, as well as parent acceptance of the treatment. The training approach targeted working memory, impulse control, and attention/relaxation (via brain electrical activity). Outcome measures included overt behavior as rated by parents and teachers, AD/HD symptom frequency, and parent opinion/feedback. Training was completed by five individuals and delivered via a themed computer game with electroencephalogram (EEG) input via a wireless, single-channel, dry-sensor, portable measurement device. The objective (i.e., training outcomes and EEG) and subjective (i.e., parent ratings/feedback and teacher ratings) data suggested that use of the neurocognitive training resulted in reduced AD/HD behaviors and improvement in socially meaningful outcomes. The parents expressed satisfaction with the training procedure and outcomes. It is concluded that the innovative neurocognitive training approach is effective for improving behavior and reducing symptoms of AD/HD for children in China.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Jiang, H. & Johnstone, S. J. (2015). A preliminary multiple case report of neurocognitive training for children with AD/HD in China. Sage Open, 5 (2), 1-13.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2844&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/1845

Number Of Pages


  • 12

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 13

Volume


  • 5

Issue


  • 2

Abstract


  • This preliminary multiple case study examined the behavioral outcomes of neurocognitive training on children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) in China, as well as parent acceptance of the treatment. The training approach targeted working memory, impulse control, and attention/relaxation (via brain electrical activity). Outcome measures included overt behavior as rated by parents and teachers, AD/HD symptom frequency, and parent opinion/feedback. Training was completed by five individuals and delivered via a themed computer game with electroencephalogram (EEG) input via a wireless, single-channel, dry-sensor, portable measurement device. The objective (i.e., training outcomes and EEG) and subjective (i.e., parent ratings/feedback and teacher ratings) data suggested that use of the neurocognitive training resulted in reduced AD/HD behaviors and improvement in socially meaningful outcomes. The parents expressed satisfaction with the training procedure and outcomes. It is concluded that the innovative neurocognitive training approach is effective for improving behavior and reducing symptoms of AD/HD for children in China.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Jiang, H. & Johnstone, S. J. (2015). A preliminary multiple case report of neurocognitive training for children with AD/HD in China. Sage Open, 5 (2), 1-13.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2844&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/1845

Number Of Pages


  • 12

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 13

Volume


  • 5

Issue


  • 2