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Progress in the implementation of conservation and management measures for bigeye and yellowfin tunas in the western and central Pacific: sharing the conservation burden and benefit

Chapter


Abstract


  • The Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) stretches approximately

    6,000 nautical miles across numerous jurisdictions, from the archipelagos

    of Southeast Asia to the remote atolls of Kiribati in the Central Pacific. This

    vast ocean is home to the world's most productive tuna fisheries, supplying

    global markets with skipjack, bigeye, yellowfin and albacore worth approximately

    US$5.5 billion.3 These fisheries are critically different from other tuna

    fisheries in that 87 per cent of all reported WCPO tuna catches are harvested

    from waters under national jurisdiction.4 Unlike the high seas tuna fisheries

    of the Eastern Pacific, Indian Ocean and North Atlantic, the WCPO tuna

    fisheries are predominantly owned by a small group of developing coastal

    States.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Q. A. Hanich & B. M. Tsamenyi, 'Progress in the implementation of conservation and management measures for bigeye and yellowfin tunas in the western and central Pacific: sharing the conservation burden and benefit' in M. Lodge & M. H. Nordquist(eds), Peaceful Order in the World's Oceans: Essays in Honor of Satya N. Nandan (2014) 358-380.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9789004249264

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84928198672

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/1943

Book Title


  • Peaceful Order in the World's Oceans: Essays in Honor of Satya N. Nandan

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • 358

End Page


  • 380

Place Of Publication


  • The Netherlands

Abstract


  • The Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) stretches approximately

    6,000 nautical miles across numerous jurisdictions, from the archipelagos

    of Southeast Asia to the remote atolls of Kiribati in the Central Pacific. This

    vast ocean is home to the world's most productive tuna fisheries, supplying

    global markets with skipjack, bigeye, yellowfin and albacore worth approximately

    US$5.5 billion.3 These fisheries are critically different from other tuna

    fisheries in that 87 per cent of all reported WCPO tuna catches are harvested

    from waters under national jurisdiction.4 Unlike the high seas tuna fisheries

    of the Eastern Pacific, Indian Ocean and North Atlantic, the WCPO tuna

    fisheries are predominantly owned by a small group of developing coastal

    States.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Q. A. Hanich & B. M. Tsamenyi, 'Progress in the implementation of conservation and management measures for bigeye and yellowfin tunas in the western and central Pacific: sharing the conservation burden and benefit' in M. Lodge & M. H. Nordquist(eds), Peaceful Order in the World's Oceans: Essays in Honor of Satya N. Nandan (2014) 358-380.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9789004249264

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84928198672

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/1943

Book Title


  • Peaceful Order in the World's Oceans: Essays in Honor of Satya N. Nandan

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • 358

End Page


  • 380

Place Of Publication


  • The Netherlands