Burns, Pippa R. Dr

Lecturer

  • Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health
  • Graduate Medicine

Overview


Pippa is currently a Lecturer within the Research and Critical Analysis Team (RCA), in the discipline of Graduate Medicine at the School of Medicine. She has been working in health for over twenty years, across sectors. This has provided her with extensive experience in the planning and management of research projects, including experience researching and evaluating programs conducted in real-world settings, such as schools, hospitals, aged-care facilities and the community. This has enabled Pippa to develop a broad range of research skills and a strong network of research partners. Pippa is currently involved in research across three main areas: health literacy; medication misadventure and delirium and dementia. 

Top Publications


Available as Research Supervisor

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • Children today are, more than ever before, likely to interact with family and community members living with a dementia. These occurrences are more likely to happen as the population ages, with over 900,000 Australians expected to be living with dementia by 2050 (Deloitte Access Economics, 2011). Project DARE developed a short education intervention for Stage 2 (ages 8 - 11 years) at a local pubic school. It utilised art as a medium for children to express their knowledge and perception of dementia. The children were introduced to the talents of local artists who spent two full days working with the children at the school and teaching them new visual art techniques and histories. In between the two art lessons the children received a lesson on dementia.<br /><br />The children presented as surprised, excited and proud to learn new art skills and to see the results of their works. The project made children aware of the issue of dementia so that they can better understand people in our community who live with a dementia. In turn, Project DARE, in its stages of infancy, has started a small but powerful wave of change in our community... children who better understand dementia, who are more open to relating to those who have dementia, creating a more caring, understanding and humanistic relationship with those around us who need our care and compassion. It is this kind of impact that we can only hope will grow, as this project grows both in Australia around the globe.
  • Previous research into the impact of leisure activities has generally come from visual and performing arts and has overlooked the benefits of domestic pursuits such as sewing, knitting and crochet. While there is a plethora of anecdotes as to the positive effects of mental and physical health, there is little empirical research in this area. <br /><br /><p>One study based in the UK investigated the benefits of knitting amongst an international sample (Riley, J., Corkhill, B., & Morris, C., 2013). They found evidence that knitting “has significant psychological and social benefits, which can contribute to well-being and quality of life” (Riley, J., Corkhill, B., & Morris, C., 2013). However, as knitting is a bilateral activity (knitters use two needles) whereas crochet is unilateral (crocheters use one hook), it cannot be assumed that the results seen for the knitters will be replicated amongst crocheters.</p><p> </p>
  • Let's Share a Story - literacy support for Indigenous children project, targeting Indigenous children in the early childhood and primary age bracket, raised awareness of the importance of encouraging and promoting the joys of reading and yarning with children. The project was undertaken in consultation with Aboriginal services and organisations and key contacts within Aboriginal communities. The project complemented literacy programs in pre-schools, schools and child care centres and community centres.
  • <p>Drawing on international experience and research, the SMILE project looked at the benefits of developing a community-based multi-sensory environment (MSE) at the Horsley Community Centre in the Illawarra. The project was forged through a unique partnership between CareWays Illawarra and the University of Wollongong (UOW). This project used participatory action research to foster the involvement of people with disabilities, their carers, families and disability services to assist in the development and design of the space to best meet the needs of the whole community. </p><p>A MSE provides a safe, non-threatening environment for children and adults with cognitive, behavioural and physical impairments to engage in a range of sensory experiences. The experiences provided by a MSE can both calm and stimulate the primary senses using sensory-based materials such as fibre optics sprays, bubble tubes, music, colour, lighting and aroma.</p>

Available as Research Supervisor

Potential Supervision Topics


    • Health literacy
    • Arts and dementia
    • Medication misadventure
    • Delirium 

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Walking the Journey of Dementia: a Community Study Wu, Darcelle

Outreach Overview


  • Pippa is passionate about connecting with external organisations to build research capacity within the community.

Teaching Overview


  • Pippa is a Lecturer within the Research and Critical Analysis Team (RCA) in Graduate Medicine. The RCA program at is a core theme of the medical course, which aims to encourage, prepare and support student engagement in medical research. RCA is integrated throughout all four phases of the medical program, including a student led research project undertaken whilst on clinical placement.

    In 2016, the RCA Team received a national award for their teaching from the Department of Education and Training: Australian Awards for University Teaching for Programs that Enhance Learning in the category of “innovation and flexibility and curricula, learning and teaching”.

    Pippa is also part of a large team of academics from the faculty of Science Medicine and Health (SMAH) who received one of the inaugural Indigenous Knowledges Grants. The team has been awarded $50,000 to map and embed Indigenous knowledges and perspectives into the curricula.

    Pippa also supervises undergraduate student projects and gives guest lectures for the Schools of Health and Society and Nursing.

Keywords


    • social determinants of health  
    • health literacy
    • older adults
    • dementia
    • asthma
    • online interventions
    • primary health care

Mailing Address


  • Northfields Avenue

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

Web Of Science Researcher Id


  • E-3477-2015

Top Publications


Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • Children today are, more than ever before, likely to interact with family and community members living with a dementia. These occurrences are more likely to happen as the population ages, with over 900,000 Australians expected to be living with dementia by 2050 (Deloitte Access Economics, 2011). Project DARE developed a short education intervention for Stage 2 (ages 8 - 11 years) at a local pubic school. It utilised art as a medium for children to express their knowledge and perception of dementia. The children were introduced to the talents of local artists who spent two full days working with the children at the school and teaching them new visual art techniques and histories. In between the two art lessons the children received a lesson on dementia.<br /><br />The children presented as surprised, excited and proud to learn new art skills and to see the results of their works. The project made children aware of the issue of dementia so that they can better understand people in our community who live with a dementia. In turn, Project DARE, in its stages of infancy, has started a small but powerful wave of change in our community... children who better understand dementia, who are more open to relating to those who have dementia, creating a more caring, understanding and humanistic relationship with those around us who need our care and compassion. It is this kind of impact that we can only hope will grow, as this project grows both in Australia around the globe.
  • Previous research into the impact of leisure activities has generally come from visual and performing arts and has overlooked the benefits of domestic pursuits such as sewing, knitting and crochet. While there is a plethora of anecdotes as to the positive effects of mental and physical health, there is little empirical research in this area. <br /><br /><p>One study based in the UK investigated the benefits of knitting amongst an international sample (Riley, J., Corkhill, B., & Morris, C., 2013). They found evidence that knitting “has significant psychological and social benefits, which can contribute to well-being and quality of life” (Riley, J., Corkhill, B., & Morris, C., 2013). However, as knitting is a bilateral activity (knitters use two needles) whereas crochet is unilateral (crocheters use one hook), it cannot be assumed that the results seen for the knitters will be replicated amongst crocheters.</p><p> </p>
  • Let's Share a Story - literacy support for Indigenous children project, targeting Indigenous children in the early childhood and primary age bracket, raised awareness of the importance of encouraging and promoting the joys of reading and yarning with children. The project was undertaken in consultation with Aboriginal services and organisations and key contacts within Aboriginal communities. The project complemented literacy programs in pre-schools, schools and child care centres and community centres.
  • <p>Drawing on international experience and research, the SMILE project looked at the benefits of developing a community-based multi-sensory environment (MSE) at the Horsley Community Centre in the Illawarra. The project was forged through a unique partnership between CareWays Illawarra and the University of Wollongong (UOW). This project used participatory action research to foster the involvement of people with disabilities, their carers, families and disability services to assist in the development and design of the space to best meet the needs of the whole community. </p><p>A MSE provides a safe, non-threatening environment for children and adults with cognitive, behavioural and physical impairments to engage in a range of sensory experiences. The experiences provided by a MSE can both calm and stimulate the primary senses using sensory-based materials such as fibre optics sprays, bubble tubes, music, colour, lighting and aroma.</p>

Potential Supervision Topics


    • Health literacy
    • Arts and dementia
    • Medication misadventure
    • Delirium 

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Walking the Journey of Dementia: a Community Study Wu, Darcelle

Outreach Overview


  • Pippa is passionate about connecting with external organisations to build research capacity within the community.

Teaching Overview


  • Pippa is a Lecturer within the Research and Critical Analysis Team (RCA) in Graduate Medicine. The RCA program at is a core theme of the medical course, which aims to encourage, prepare and support student engagement in medical research. RCA is integrated throughout all four phases of the medical program, including a student led research project undertaken whilst on clinical placement.

    In 2016, the RCA Team received a national award for their teaching from the Department of Education and Training: Australian Awards for University Teaching for Programs that Enhance Learning in the category of “innovation and flexibility and curricula, learning and teaching”.

    Pippa is also part of a large team of academics from the faculty of Science Medicine and Health (SMAH) who received one of the inaugural Indigenous Knowledges Grants. The team has been awarded $50,000 to map and embed Indigenous knowledges and perspectives into the curricula.

    Pippa also supervises undergraduate student projects and gives guest lectures for the Schools of Health and Society and Nursing.

Keywords


    • social determinants of health  
    • health literacy
    • older adults
    • dementia
    • asthma
    • online interventions
    • primary health care

Mailing Address


  • Northfields Avenue

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

Web Of Science Researcher Id


  • E-3477-2015
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