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Ogie, Robert Ighodaro. Dr.

Associate Research Fellow (Critical Infrastructure & Disaster Modelling)

  • Primary Group - SMART Infrastructure Facility
  • Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences

Overview


Robert brings an Engineering and Information Systems background to the multidisciplinary field of disaster informatics, where his interest is to deliver innovative means by which information and emerging technologies can be used to improve decision making during the prevention, preparation, response and recovery phases of disaster management. He is particularly interested in applying empirical methods (both qualitative and quantitative) to understand the social-technical complexities that characterise the use of these systems for disaster response. His motivation in research is driven by a working research question: how can we better design systems and harness existing resources to enhance decision making and improve the resilience of people, infrastructure and businesses to both man-made and natural hazards? Robert’s PhD research investigates how the management of hydrological infrastructure assets such as waterways, floodgates, pumps, etc. can be improved through a data-driven approach that relies on non-conventional data sources like crowdsourced social media data, locally-made cheap sensors and graph representations of the hydrological infrastructure network. The research, which was investigated through a combination of quantitative methods like computational and network analysis, contributes significantly to improving decision making and flood control outcomes in data-starved regions, particularly coastal mega-cities in developing nations.

Available as Research Supervisor

Impact Story


  • <p>PetaJakarta.org (Map Jakarta) was the result of a world-first Joint Pilot Study initiated by researchers at the SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong (UOW), in collaboration with the Jakarta Emergency Management Agency (BPBD DKI) and social media giant Twitter. Jakarta is regularly devastated by flooding during the annual monsoon. The infrastructure of this dense metropolis tends to <a href="http://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2015/11/05/how-to-draw-a-city-the-basics/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lag behind its rate of growth</a>, making it vulnerable to natural disasters such as severe, city-wide flooding.</p><p>Citizens had constantly criticised Jakarta’s Government Emergency Management Agency for their slow responses to natural disasters. As the tenth largest city in the world and with one of the highest numbers of Twitter users on the planet, there was an opportunity for this social media platform to play a significant role in flood management in Jakarta.</p><p>For the first time, PetaJakarta.org empowered Jakarta citizens who know flooding in their locale the best, to actively report to government, enabling greater information sharing and data coordination among citizens and government agencies; this had, although long been desired, never ever possible before. Citizens of Jakarta could identify locations of flooding in real-time, helping them safely navigate the city. The novel technical solution has fostered equitable and collaborative adaptability and resilience to increasing environmental disasters with climate change.</p>

Keywords


  • Crisis/disaster informatics, IT-enabled citizen engagement in disaster response, Graph-based network modelling and analysis of Infrastructure systems, Quantitative approaches of assessing infrastructure resilience and vulnerabilities

Impact Story


  • <p>PetaJakarta.org (Map Jakarta) was the result of a world-first Joint Pilot Study initiated by researchers at the SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong (UOW), in collaboration with the Jakarta Emergency Management Agency (BPBD DKI) and social media giant Twitter. Jakarta is regularly devastated by flooding during the annual monsoon. The infrastructure of this dense metropolis tends to <a href="http://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2015/11/05/how-to-draw-a-city-the-basics/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lag behind its rate of growth</a>, making it vulnerable to natural disasters such as severe, city-wide flooding.</p><p>Citizens had constantly criticised Jakarta’s Government Emergency Management Agency for their slow responses to natural disasters. As the tenth largest city in the world and with one of the highest numbers of Twitter users on the planet, there was an opportunity for this social media platform to play a significant role in flood management in Jakarta.</p><p>For the first time, PetaJakarta.org empowered Jakarta citizens who know flooding in their locale the best, to actively report to government, enabling greater information sharing and data coordination among citizens and government agencies; this had, although long been desired, never ever possible before. Citizens of Jakarta could identify locations of flooding in real-time, helping them safely navigate the city. The novel technical solution has fostered equitable and collaborative adaptability and resilience to increasing environmental disasters with climate change.</p>

Keywords


  • Crisis/disaster informatics, IT-enabled citizen engagement in disaster response, Graph-based network modelling and analysis of Infrastructure systems, Quantitative approaches of assessing infrastructure resilience and vulnerabilities