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Eady, Michelle J. Dr.

Senior Lecturer Faculty Director - Work Integrated Learning (WIL) & Professional Placements

  • Faculty of Social Sciences
  • Associate Member - Early Start Research
  • School of Education
  • Senior Fellow - Higher Education Academy, UK 2016 -
  • Fellow - Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA) 2017 -

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • A critical dimension to my practice is sharing my expertise, research and reviews of current developments with my peers and students. Since my academic career began in 2010, my work has been published in a variety of peer reviewed journals and books. My scholarly writing reflects the lessons I have learned, informed by my research data and professional practice. I have presented papers internationally, providing opportunities to discuss emerging issues with my peers, receive feedback, and promote collaboration with other experts in my field. Similarly, at the local level, my active involvement in visiting public schools enables me to identify what is ‘best demonstrated practice’ with a view to including this in my teaching (Korthagen, 2010). 

    My goal of developing a Community of Practice with my students and colleagues is furthered by scaffolding my students to understand how to become researchers themselves (Keegan, 2016). The outcome of this is that I have been actively involved in creating new subjects in our degree: Professional Studies: The teacher as a managing professional and Professional Studies: The teacher as a researcher. The second of these helps students understand how research influences teaching, particularly action-research in the classroom.

    The subject outline states, “Beginning teachers are now widely expected to be evidenced-based practitioners. The capacity to locate, read and critically engage with research is a core professional attribute... In this subject students will: build the knowledge and skills required to access educationally-relevant published research; evaluate its merit by applying knowledge of research methodologies; and consider the educational implications and impact by comparing and synthesising findings within the field.”

    My passion is to find the evidence through meaningful research and authentic experiences to help us develop the best primary educators possible.

Available for Collaborative Projects

Member Of


Has Collaborator


Attended Event


Selected Publications


Presentations


Impact Story


  • Children today are, more than ever before, likely to interact with family and community members living with a dementia. These occurrences are more likely to happen as the population ages, with over 900,000 Australians expected to be living with dementia by 2050 (Deloitte Access Economics, 2011). Project DARE developed a short education intervention for Stage 2 (ages 8 - 11 years) at a local pubic school. It utilised art as a medium for children to express their knowledge and perception of dementia. The children were introduced to the talents of local artists who spent two full days working with the children at the school and teaching them new visual art techniques and histories. In between the two art lessons the children received a lesson on dementia.<br /><br />The children presented as surprised, excited and proud to learn new art skills and to see the results of their works. The project made children aware of the issue of dementia so that they can better understand people in our community who live with a dementia. In turn, Project DARE, in its stages of infancy, has started a small but powerful wave of change in our community... children who better understand dementia, who are more open to relating to those who have dementia, creating a more caring, understanding and humanistic relationship with those around us who need our care and compassion. It is this kind of impact that we can only hope will grow, as this project grows both in Australia around the globe.

Potential Supervision Topics


  • I am interested in supervising Higher Degree Research students who are wanting to research the following topics:
    • primary school teacher training
    • school/university/community partnerships
    • the third space in education
    • relationships in education
    • Indigenous strengths
    • synchronous learning platforms

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Evidence-based web-mediated professional learning program for early childhood education and care addressing physical activity and healthy eating behaviours of young children Peden, Michele
    Doctor of Philosophy Coming into the Third Space: What Motivates Primary School Educators to Work in Partnership with Tertiary Institutions to Prepare Pre-Service Teachers? Green, Corinne
    Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) How Does the Supervising Registered Nurse Impact the Student¿s Work Place Experience? Livingstone, Kimberley
    Doctor of Philosophy Development of a sociocultural program to support young Indigenous children's consonant production Pogson, Carolyn
    Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) How does university study impact the ways women, who have experienced domestic violence, rebuild their lives? Lewer, Kelly

Outreach Overview


  • I am a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (UK) and a Fellow of the Higher Education Research Development Society of Australia as well as a member of several professional teaching and learning organisations. These associations provide me with insights into research and trends in education both nationally and internationally, and connect me to ongoing developments in education. I present at one national and one international conference on teaching and learning each year. At these conferences I connect with other educators and researchers, resulting in a collegial network where I continue to learn, publish and grow (Abrahamson, 2015).

    I have been nominated for an Outstanding Contribution to Teaching and Learning (OCTAL) award each year since I started teaching at the University of Wollongong, and in 2012 was awarded an OCTAL. Nationally, my contribution to teaching and learning was recognised with a National Office of Learning and Teaching (OLT) Citation for “enhancing quality teacher education linking theory and practice through innovative work experience integrated learning opportunities in community school partnerships”.  I am also a fellow of the Wollongong Academy of Tertiary and Learning Excellence (WATTLE).  It is important to have recognition for the skills that I possess as a quality tertiary educator as so much of the focus of our practice as academics in on our research (Miller, Taylor, & Bedeian, 2011). My work is to encourage, support, facilitate and inspire others to be great teachers through the mentoring (Williams, 2014) that I provide. 

Education And Training


  • Ph.D. in Education, Faculty of Education 2007 - 2010
  • M.Ed. in Curriculum Studies, Lakehead University, Education 2000 - 2004
  • Graduate Diploma of Social Science in Education, University of Wollongong, Education 1995 - 1996
  • B.A. in Psychology/Linguistics, Carleton University, Faculty of Arts 1990 - 1995

Awards And Honors


Teaching Overview


  • My career in teaching has evolved to the role of university academic with a specialisation in teaching primary educators .  I believe that education is an area where I can make the greatest impact on society. My philosophy of teaching has developed and shaped as a result of my experiences from a very young age working with children, through my years as a classroom teacher, to where I am now; educating the teachers of tomorrow.

    My philosophy is entrenched deeply in an a quote derived from the Chinese Confucian philosopher Xunzi (312-230 BC), “Not having heard something is not as good as having heard it; having heard it is not as good as having seen it; having seen it is not as good as knowing it; knowing it is not as good as putting it into practice.” (p. 81).  We now commonly reiterate this as "Tell me and I forget; teach me and I may remember; involve me and I will learn.”

    My teaching is rooted in three theories and frameworks:

    1. Authentic Learning

    I believe that as educators, we must help future teachers understand that learning has moved away from didactic practice and that it involves authentic learning experiences (Herrington, 2006) and most importantly produces transformative learners. As Kalantizis and Cope (2005) explain, we need to help our children “be aware of what they don’t know, capable of working out what they need to know and be able to create their own knowledge.” (p.41)

    2. Quality Teaching

    In order to accomplish this, an excellent guide for academics in the field of education is the NSW Quality Teaching Framework. I attempt to immerse all of my teaching practices in the elements of quality learning environments, intellectual quality and significance (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2008) and engage my students to do the same with their own teaching practice.

    3. Community of Practice

    Finally, I rely heavily on the practice of situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991) that defines learning as a social construct (Vygotsky, 1978) yet in a context and with a group of like-minded individuals or community of practice. My students are given opportunities to collaborate with each other, as well as with me, to learn and gain expertise about the primary school pedagogy.

    While I believe that there is still a place for the transmission to a cohort of information using a lecture format , I also believe in being an approachable, team player who engages students in real, meaningful,  supportive and innovative ways that support their learning about teaching and their own teaching practices. I work tirelessly each year to build a vibrant community of practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991) in my classes. I want them to understand the importance of social collaboration and meaningful learning to take into their own classrooms. As members of our community of enthusiastic lifelong learners, students are responsible not only to themselves, but to the other members of the community, including me.

Keywords


  • teacher education, authentic learning, workplace integrated learning, Indigenous community learning, community strength, synchronous technologies

Full Name


  • Dr Michelle Jean Eady

Mailing Address


  • 23.G09 University of Wollongong

    Northfields Avenue

    Wollongong

    New South Wales

    2522

    Australia

Web Of Science Researcher Id


  • N-9166-2015

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • A critical dimension to my practice is sharing my expertise, research and reviews of current developments with my peers and students. Since my academic career began in 2010, my work has been published in a variety of peer reviewed journals and books. My scholarly writing reflects the lessons I have learned, informed by my research data and professional practice. I have presented papers internationally, providing opportunities to discuss emerging issues with my peers, receive feedback, and promote collaboration with other experts in my field. Similarly, at the local level, my active involvement in visiting public schools enables me to identify what is ‘best demonstrated practice’ with a view to including this in my teaching (Korthagen, 2010). 

    My goal of developing a Community of Practice with my students and colleagues is furthered by scaffolding my students to understand how to become researchers themselves (Keegan, 2016). The outcome of this is that I have been actively involved in creating new subjects in our degree: Professional Studies: The teacher as a managing professional and Professional Studies: The teacher as a researcher. The second of these helps students understand how research influences teaching, particularly action-research in the classroom.

    The subject outline states, “Beginning teachers are now widely expected to be evidenced-based practitioners. The capacity to locate, read and critically engage with research is a core professional attribute... In this subject students will: build the knowledge and skills required to access educationally-relevant published research; evaluate its merit by applying knowledge of research methodologies; and consider the educational implications and impact by comparing and synthesising findings within the field.”

    My passion is to find the evidence through meaningful research and authentic experiences to help us develop the best primary educators possible.

Member Of


Has Collaborator


Attended Event


Selected Publications


Presentations


Impact Story


  • Children today are, more than ever before, likely to interact with family and community members living with a dementia. These occurrences are more likely to happen as the population ages, with over 900,000 Australians expected to be living with dementia by 2050 (Deloitte Access Economics, 2011). Project DARE developed a short education intervention for Stage 2 (ages 8 - 11 years) at a local pubic school. It utilised art as a medium for children to express their knowledge and perception of dementia. The children were introduced to the talents of local artists who spent two full days working with the children at the school and teaching them new visual art techniques and histories. In between the two art lessons the children received a lesson on dementia.<br /><br />The children presented as surprised, excited and proud to learn new art skills and to see the results of their works. The project made children aware of the issue of dementia so that they can better understand people in our community who live with a dementia. In turn, Project DARE, in its stages of infancy, has started a small but powerful wave of change in our community... children who better understand dementia, who are more open to relating to those who have dementia, creating a more caring, understanding and humanistic relationship with those around us who need our care and compassion. It is this kind of impact that we can only hope will grow, as this project grows both in Australia around the globe.

Potential Supervision Topics


  • I am interested in supervising Higher Degree Research students who are wanting to research the following topics:
    • primary school teacher training
    • school/university/community partnerships
    • the third space in education
    • relationships in education
    • Indigenous strengths
    • synchronous learning platforms

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Evidence-based web-mediated professional learning program for early childhood education and care addressing physical activity and healthy eating behaviours of young children Peden, Michele
    Doctor of Philosophy Coming into the Third Space: What Motivates Primary School Educators to Work in Partnership with Tertiary Institutions to Prepare Pre-Service Teachers? Green, Corinne
    Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) How Does the Supervising Registered Nurse Impact the Student¿s Work Place Experience? Livingstone, Kimberley
    Doctor of Philosophy Development of a sociocultural program to support young Indigenous children's consonant production Pogson, Carolyn
    Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) How does university study impact the ways women, who have experienced domestic violence, rebuild their lives? Lewer, Kelly

Outreach Overview


  • I am a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (UK) and a Fellow of the Higher Education Research Development Society of Australia as well as a member of several professional teaching and learning organisations. These associations provide me with insights into research and trends in education both nationally and internationally, and connect me to ongoing developments in education. I present at one national and one international conference on teaching and learning each year. At these conferences I connect with other educators and researchers, resulting in a collegial network where I continue to learn, publish and grow (Abrahamson, 2015).

    I have been nominated for an Outstanding Contribution to Teaching and Learning (OCTAL) award each year since I started teaching at the University of Wollongong, and in 2012 was awarded an OCTAL. Nationally, my contribution to teaching and learning was recognised with a National Office of Learning and Teaching (OLT) Citation for “enhancing quality teacher education linking theory and practice through innovative work experience integrated learning opportunities in community school partnerships”.  I am also a fellow of the Wollongong Academy of Tertiary and Learning Excellence (WATTLE).  It is important to have recognition for the skills that I possess as a quality tertiary educator as so much of the focus of our practice as academics in on our research (Miller, Taylor, & Bedeian, 2011). My work is to encourage, support, facilitate and inspire others to be great teachers through the mentoring (Williams, 2014) that I provide. 

Education And Training


  • Ph.D. in Education, Faculty of Education 2007 - 2010
  • M.Ed. in Curriculum Studies, Lakehead University, Education 2000 - 2004
  • Graduate Diploma of Social Science in Education, University of Wollongong, Education 1995 - 1996
  • B.A. in Psychology/Linguistics, Carleton University, Faculty of Arts 1990 - 1995

Awards And Honors


Teaching Overview


  • My career in teaching has evolved to the role of university academic with a specialisation in teaching primary educators .  I believe that education is an area where I can make the greatest impact on society. My philosophy of teaching has developed and shaped as a result of my experiences from a very young age working with children, through my years as a classroom teacher, to where I am now; educating the teachers of tomorrow.

    My philosophy is entrenched deeply in an a quote derived from the Chinese Confucian philosopher Xunzi (312-230 BC), “Not having heard something is not as good as having heard it; having heard it is not as good as having seen it; having seen it is not as good as knowing it; knowing it is not as good as putting it into practice.” (p. 81).  We now commonly reiterate this as "Tell me and I forget; teach me and I may remember; involve me and I will learn.”

    My teaching is rooted in three theories and frameworks:

    1. Authentic Learning

    I believe that as educators, we must help future teachers understand that learning has moved away from didactic practice and that it involves authentic learning experiences (Herrington, 2006) and most importantly produces transformative learners. As Kalantizis and Cope (2005) explain, we need to help our children “be aware of what they don’t know, capable of working out what they need to know and be able to create their own knowledge.” (p.41)

    2. Quality Teaching

    In order to accomplish this, an excellent guide for academics in the field of education is the NSW Quality Teaching Framework. I attempt to immerse all of my teaching practices in the elements of quality learning environments, intellectual quality and significance (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2008) and engage my students to do the same with their own teaching practice.

    3. Community of Practice

    Finally, I rely heavily on the practice of situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991) that defines learning as a social construct (Vygotsky, 1978) yet in a context and with a group of like-minded individuals or community of practice. My students are given opportunities to collaborate with each other, as well as with me, to learn and gain expertise about the primary school pedagogy.

    While I believe that there is still a place for the transmission to a cohort of information using a lecture format , I also believe in being an approachable, team player who engages students in real, meaningful,  supportive and innovative ways that support their learning about teaching and their own teaching practices. I work tirelessly each year to build a vibrant community of practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991) in my classes. I want them to understand the importance of social collaboration and meaningful learning to take into their own classrooms. As members of our community of enthusiastic lifelong learners, students are responsible not only to themselves, but to the other members of the community, including me.

Keywords


  • teacher education, authentic learning, workplace integrated learning, Indigenous community learning, community strength, synchronous technologies

Full Name


  • Dr Michelle Jean Eady

Mailing Address


  • 23.G09 University of Wollongong

    Northfields Avenue

    Wollongong

    New South Wales

    2522

    Australia

Web Of Science Researcher Id


  • N-9166-2015

Geographic Focus