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Berryman, Matthew J.

Faculty Member

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • <p>PetaJakarta.org (Map Jakarta) was the result of a world-first Joint Pilot Study initiated by researchers at the SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong (UOW), in collaboration with the Jakarta Emergency Management Agency (BPBD DKI) and social media giant Twitter. Jakarta is regularly devastated by flooding during the annual monsoon. The infrastructure of this dense metropolis tends to <a href="http://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2015/11/05/how-to-draw-a-city-the-basics/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lag behind its rate of growth</a>, making it vulnerable to natural disasters such as severe, city-wide flooding.</p><p>Citizens had constantly criticised Jakarta’s Government Emergency Management Agency for their slow responses to natural disasters. As the tenth largest city in the world and with one of the highest numbers of Twitter users on the planet, there was an opportunity for this social media platform to play a significant role in flood management in Jakarta.</p><p>For the first time, PetaJakarta.org empowered Jakarta citizens who know flooding in their locale the best, to actively report to government, enabling greater information sharing and data coordination among citizens and government agencies; this had, although long been desired, never ever possible before. Citizens of Jakarta could identify locations of flooding in real-time, helping them safely navigate the city. The novel technical solution has fostered equitable and collaborative adaptability and resilience to increasing environmental disasters with climate change.</p>

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • <p>PetaJakarta.org (Map Jakarta) was the result of a world-first Joint Pilot Study initiated by researchers at the SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong (UOW), in collaboration with the Jakarta Emergency Management Agency (BPBD DKI) and social media giant Twitter. Jakarta is regularly devastated by flooding during the annual monsoon. The infrastructure of this dense metropolis tends to <a href="http://voices.nationalgeographic.org/2015/11/05/how-to-draw-a-city-the-basics/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lag behind its rate of growth</a>, making it vulnerable to natural disasters such as severe, city-wide flooding.</p><p>Citizens had constantly criticised Jakarta’s Government Emergency Management Agency for their slow responses to natural disasters. As the tenth largest city in the world and with one of the highest numbers of Twitter users on the planet, there was an opportunity for this social media platform to play a significant role in flood management in Jakarta.</p><p>For the first time, PetaJakarta.org empowered Jakarta citizens who know flooding in their locale the best, to actively report to government, enabling greater information sharing and data coordination among citizens and government agencies; this had, although long been desired, never ever possible before. Citizens of Jakarta could identify locations of flooding in real-time, helping them safely navigate the city. The novel technical solution has fostered equitable and collaborative adaptability and resilience to increasing environmental disasters with climate change.</p>
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