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Portella Garcia, Maina Dr.

Research Fellow

  • Research Fellow - School of Mechanical, Materials, Mechatronic and Biomedical Engineering | Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences

Overview


Dr Maina Garcia obtained a PhD degree in 2018 from the Federal University of ABC in Brazil. During her PhD she joined the department of Material Science and Metallurgy in Cambridge, UK as a visiting PhD student. In her PhD, she studied the weldability of automotive steels and the effect of welding in the corrosion of the weldment. She is currently a research fellow at School of Mechanical, Materials & Mechatronics Engineering.
The goal of her research is to develop a deep understanding on the optimization of the steel alloy design that minimizes the deterioration in properties after welding. Ultimately, her research aims to communicate with industry to reflect in practical economic benefits and most important to enhance the structural integrity and safety of critical infrastructures

Top Publications


    Year Title
    2017 Corrosion Behavior of Metal Active Gas Welded Joints of a High-Strength Steel for Automotive Application
    Published in   Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance

Research Overview


  • Steel is probably the most versatile material and has been pivotal in the development of society from primitive agriculture to modern warfare equipment and other critical infrastructures. There are over a thousand different steel grades to meet a wide range of applications.

    Steel involves a complicated processing route and are produced in relatively basic shapes and so requires downstream fabrication and shaping before final application. Welding is a key enabling technology that ensures the joining of complex structures including the construction of long-distance oil and gas pipelines.

     The steel employed in high pressure gas pipelines are finely tuned alloyed steels with calculated additions of microalloying additions (alloy design) to provide strength, toughness, ductility, and fracture resistance. However, these steels experience a serious deterioration of all these properties in the region immediately adjacent to the weld where, during welding, the temperature reaches the melting point of the steel. In this region the carefully orchestrated microstructure of the steel is destroyed.

    The goal of my research therefore is to develop a deep understanding on the optimisation of the steel alloy design that minimises the deterioration in properties after welding. Ultimately, we aim to communicate with industry to reflect in practical economic benefits and most important to enhance the structural integrity and safety of critical infrastructures.

     

Selected Publications


  • Journal Article

    Year Title
    2017

    Published In
    Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance

Full Name


  • Dr. MainĂ£ Portella Garcia Barnett

Mailing Address


  • Northfields Ave

    Building 2 - 111

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

Top Publications


    Year Title
    2017 Corrosion Behavior of Metal Active Gas Welded Joints of a High-Strength Steel for Automotive Application
    Published in   Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance

Research Overview


  • Steel is probably the most versatile material and has been pivotal in the development of society from primitive agriculture to modern warfare equipment and other critical infrastructures. There are over a thousand different steel grades to meet a wide range of applications.

    Steel involves a complicated processing route and are produced in relatively basic shapes and so requires downstream fabrication and shaping before final application. Welding is a key enabling technology that ensures the joining of complex structures including the construction of long-distance oil and gas pipelines.

     The steel employed in high pressure gas pipelines are finely tuned alloyed steels with calculated additions of microalloying additions (alloy design) to provide strength, toughness, ductility, and fracture resistance. However, these steels experience a serious deterioration of all these properties in the region immediately adjacent to the weld where, during welding, the temperature reaches the melting point of the steel. In this region the carefully orchestrated microstructure of the steel is destroyed.

    The goal of my research therefore is to develop a deep understanding on the optimisation of the steel alloy design that minimises the deterioration in properties after welding. Ultimately, we aim to communicate with industry to reflect in practical economic benefits and most important to enhance the structural integrity and safety of critical infrastructures.

     

Selected Publications


  • Journal Article

    Year Title
    2017

    Published In
    Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance

Full Name


  • Dr. MainĂ£ Portella Garcia Barnett

Mailing Address


  • Northfields Ave

    Building 2 - 111

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia