Phillipson, Lyn J. Dr

NHMRC-ARC Dementia Fellow

  • Faculty of Social Sciences
  • School of Health and Society
  • NHMRC-ARC Dementia Fellow - Australian Health Services Research Institute 2016 - 2020
  • Age-Friendly Environments Mentor (MENTOR-AFE) - World Health Organisation and International Federation on Ageing 2018 - 2019

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Lyn is an award-winning public health academic with an interest in social health and the personal, social, environmental and service factors which support it. She has expertise in working with people with dementia and their carers and the use of participatory and visual research methods. Lyn also has expertise in the use of social marketing as an action framework to promote health in the areas of: dementia friendly communities, dementia risk reduction, dementia help-seeking and service utilisation and cancer help-seeking in CALD communities.

    In 2018, Lyn was appointed as an WHO-IFA Age Friendly Mentor which supports her contribution to the development of global capacity to create Age and Dementia Friendly Environments. She also plays a leadership role at the University of Wollongong, engaging researchers from all disciplines in the global challenges associated with dementia through the Dementia Enabling University Strategy. 

    Examples of her current research include:

    • Exploring the impact of Consumer Directed Care on people with dementia who are recipients of Home Care Packages (NHMRC-ARC Fellowship)
    • Development of ‘Dementia Friendly Communities and Organisations’ in the Kiama Local Government area (Global Challenges, UOW).
    • Promoting Intergenerational Playgroups in Residential Aged Settings (Playgroups NSW, Liveable Communities Grant)
    • Safe and Just Futures for People living with Dementia in Residential Aged Care (Dementia Research Foundation)
    • Rethink Respite - a social marketing approach to promote respite service use in carers of people with dementia in the Illawarra-Shoalhaven (Alzheimer's Australia Dementia Research Foundation)
    • Improving older persons' involvement in decisions concerning their health care (IRT Foundation)

     

Available as Research Supervisor

Selected Publications


Investigator On


Impact Story


  • <p>Alongside the demographic aging of the population, there is a corresponding increase in the number of people living with dementia. International estimates are 46 million, with this number expected to rise to 138 million by 2050 (ADI, 2016). The increasing prevalence of dementia will demand a shift in both the social and the physical environments within which we live. Low levels of public understanding can contribute to the fear, stigma and social exclusion associated with living with dementia. Public spaces and civic buildings are not often designed in ways which are supportive of people with dementia participating in civic life. ‘Dementia friendly’ communities aim to address this by empowering people with dementia and increasing their social inclusion. They also aim to create more supportive physical environment to enable participation.</p><p>The ‘Dementia Friendly Kiama’ project (led by Dr Lyn Phillipson) and colleagues from UOW (Brennan-Horley, Fleming, Cridland, Hall and Hasan) is a partnership between the University of Wollongong (UOW) Global Challenges Program, the Kiama Municipal Council, the Kiama community and Dementia Australia. The project utilises a Community-based Participatory Action Research framework to inform the development, implementation and evaluation of a multicomponent dementia-friendly community intervention.  Research in Kiama has included interviews and mapping exercises with people with dementia and their carers, community and business surveys, piloting a Dementia-friendly business toolkit and the development of an environmental assessment tool for use in the auditing of public buildings. Formative research activities guided the Action Plan of a local Dementia Alliance and Dementia Advisory Group. Evaluative research activities monitor inputs, outputs, impacts and outcomes of the project. Key achievements include:</p><p>1.)           The empowerment of people living with dementia – including opportunities for civic participation, social inclusion and peer support through the Southern Dementia Advisory Group and other project activities</p><p>2.)           Improved community understanding and increased positive attitudes with regard to the capabilities of people living with dementia. This has been achieved via education sessions (with over 1000 attendances) and the development of new information resources e.g. the ‘Dementia Illawarra’ website (<a href="www.dementiaIS.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">www.dementiaIS.com</a>).</p><p>3.)           Tools to improve the physical environment –including the Dementia Friendly Communities Environmental Assessment Tool (DFC-EAT) and the establishment of the ‘OurPlace’ Kiama mapping tool (http://ourplacemap.com/)</p><p>4.)           Public recognition and acclaim - the project received an Excellence in Community Partnerships Award at the National Disability Awards (2016) and was recognised at the 7th Global Conference for the Alliance of Healthy Cities (2016) by the World Health Organisation.</p><p>5.) The model and tools have informed Dementia Australia’s $3.9 million ‘National Dementia Friendly Communities Strategy’ (funded by the Department of Health, 2017-2021.</p><p>6.) The project has also had an impact at UOW. Programs such as the ‘Dementia Enabling University Strategy’ has increased opportunities for students from all five faculties to study the impact of dementia and consider their role in the creation of a dementia friendly society. The Global Challenges project has also continued to support new interdisciplinary projects that address the societal challenges of dementia.</p><p> </p>

Available as Research Supervisor

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy ‘Big Food and Corporate Social Responsibility: deception or public good?’
    Doctor of Philosophy The symbolic meaning associated with sun protection and tanning in adolescents: A study of attitudes and behaviours in outdoor environments Kurtulmus, Yasmen
    Master of Philosophy Lost in translation? exploring the usefulness of three methods to identify best sources of evidence for care staff on the non-pharmacological alleviation of responsive behaviours in dementia Kubel, Catherine
    Doctor of Philosophy Conceptualizing and exploring stigma and the social construction of the HPV vaccination, Academic and community discourses Prokopovich, Kathleen
    Doctor of Philosophy Exploring Employee Experiences of retirement due to signs and symptoms of pementia Andrew, Catherine
    Doctor of Philosophy What is the impact of the marketisation of the commonwealth home care packages on the lived relational experience of informal carers? Duncan, Catherine
    Doctor of Philosophy A double edged spear - the social life of youth, mobile phones and social media in a remote Aboriginal community Kariippanon, Kishan
    Doctor of Philosophy Examining the impact of dementia on patterns of hospitalisation: A longitudinal analysis of hospital admissions in the Illawarra and Shoalhaven Cappetta, Kara

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Lyn is an award-winning public health academic with an interest in social health and the personal, social, environmental and service factors which support it. She has expertise in working with people with dementia and their carers and the use of participatory and visual research methods. Lyn also has expertise in the use of social marketing as an action framework to promote health in the areas of: dementia friendly communities, dementia risk reduction, dementia help-seeking and service utilisation and cancer help-seeking in CALD communities.

    In 2018, Lyn was appointed as an WHO-IFA Age Friendly Mentor which supports her contribution to the development of global capacity to create Age and Dementia Friendly Environments. She also plays a leadership role at the University of Wollongong, engaging researchers from all disciplines in the global challenges associated with dementia through the Dementia Enabling University Strategy. 

    Examples of her current research include:

    • Exploring the impact of Consumer Directed Care on people with dementia who are recipients of Home Care Packages (NHMRC-ARC Fellowship)
    • Development of ‘Dementia Friendly Communities and Organisations’ in the Kiama Local Government area (Global Challenges, UOW).
    • Promoting Intergenerational Playgroups in Residential Aged Settings (Playgroups NSW, Liveable Communities Grant)
    • Safe and Just Futures for People living with Dementia in Residential Aged Care (Dementia Research Foundation)
    • Rethink Respite - a social marketing approach to promote respite service use in carers of people with dementia in the Illawarra-Shoalhaven (Alzheimer's Australia Dementia Research Foundation)
    • Improving older persons' involvement in decisions concerning their health care (IRT Foundation)

     

Selected Publications


Investigator On


Impact Story


  • <p>Alongside the demographic aging of the population, there is a corresponding increase in the number of people living with dementia. International estimates are 46 million, with this number expected to rise to 138 million by 2050 (ADI, 2016). The increasing prevalence of dementia will demand a shift in both the social and the physical environments within which we live. Low levels of public understanding can contribute to the fear, stigma and social exclusion associated with living with dementia. Public spaces and civic buildings are not often designed in ways which are supportive of people with dementia participating in civic life. ‘Dementia friendly’ communities aim to address this by empowering people with dementia and increasing their social inclusion. They also aim to create more supportive physical environment to enable participation.</p><p>The ‘Dementia Friendly Kiama’ project (led by Dr Lyn Phillipson) and colleagues from UOW (Brennan-Horley, Fleming, Cridland, Hall and Hasan) is a partnership between the University of Wollongong (UOW) Global Challenges Program, the Kiama Municipal Council, the Kiama community and Dementia Australia. The project utilises a Community-based Participatory Action Research framework to inform the development, implementation and evaluation of a multicomponent dementia-friendly community intervention.  Research in Kiama has included interviews and mapping exercises with people with dementia and their carers, community and business surveys, piloting a Dementia-friendly business toolkit and the development of an environmental assessment tool for use in the auditing of public buildings. Formative research activities guided the Action Plan of a local Dementia Alliance and Dementia Advisory Group. Evaluative research activities monitor inputs, outputs, impacts and outcomes of the project. Key achievements include:</p><p>1.)           The empowerment of people living with dementia – including opportunities for civic participation, social inclusion and peer support through the Southern Dementia Advisory Group and other project activities</p><p>2.)           Improved community understanding and increased positive attitudes with regard to the capabilities of people living with dementia. This has been achieved via education sessions (with over 1000 attendances) and the development of new information resources e.g. the ‘Dementia Illawarra’ website (<a href="www.dementiaIS.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">www.dementiaIS.com</a>).</p><p>3.)           Tools to improve the physical environment –including the Dementia Friendly Communities Environmental Assessment Tool (DFC-EAT) and the establishment of the ‘OurPlace’ Kiama mapping tool (http://ourplacemap.com/)</p><p>4.)           Public recognition and acclaim - the project received an Excellence in Community Partnerships Award at the National Disability Awards (2016) and was recognised at the 7th Global Conference for the Alliance of Healthy Cities (2016) by the World Health Organisation.</p><p>5.) The model and tools have informed Dementia Australia’s $3.9 million ‘National Dementia Friendly Communities Strategy’ (funded by the Department of Health, 2017-2021.</p><p>6.) The project has also had an impact at UOW. Programs such as the ‘Dementia Enabling University Strategy’ has increased opportunities for students from all five faculties to study the impact of dementia and consider their role in the creation of a dementia friendly society. The Global Challenges project has also continued to support new interdisciplinary projects that address the societal challenges of dementia.</p><p> </p>

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy ‘Big Food and Corporate Social Responsibility: deception or public good?’
    Doctor of Philosophy The symbolic meaning associated with sun protection and tanning in adolescents: A study of attitudes and behaviours in outdoor environments Kurtulmus, Yasmen
    Master of Philosophy Lost in translation? exploring the usefulness of three methods to identify best sources of evidence for care staff on the non-pharmacological alleviation of responsive behaviours in dementia Kubel, Catherine
    Doctor of Philosophy Conceptualizing and exploring stigma and the social construction of the HPV vaccination, Academic and community discourses Prokopovich, Kathleen
    Doctor of Philosophy Exploring Employee Experiences of retirement due to signs and symptoms of pementia Andrew, Catherine
    Doctor of Philosophy What is the impact of the marketisation of the commonwealth home care packages on the lived relational experience of informal carers? Duncan, Catherine
    Doctor of Philosophy A double edged spear - the social life of youth, mobile phones and social media in a remote Aboriginal community Kariippanon, Kishan
    Doctor of Philosophy Examining the impact of dementia on patterns of hospitalisation: A longitudinal analysis of hospital admissions in the Illawarra and Shoalhaven Cappetta, Kara
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