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Ihlein, Lucas M. Dr

Senior Lecturer

  • Faculty of the Arts, Social Science and Humanities
  • School of the Arts, English and Media
  • Senior Lecturer - Faculty of the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Dr Lucas Ihlein is Senior Lecturer in the School of The Arts, English and Media. He uses a creative-practice based research methodology (including blogging, printmaking, public events, and scholarly publication) to explore complex environmental management issues, with a particular focus on Australian agriculture. His  research project: Sugar vs the Reef – Socially Engaged Art and Urgent Environmental Problems was the focus of his ARC DECRA Fellowship from 2016-19.

    Lucas is a member of the following research networks:

Geographic Focus


Available as Research Supervisor

Available for Collaborative Projects

Has Collaborator


Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • <p><i>Sugar vs the Reef?</i> was a creative arts research project by Dr Lucas Ihlein and PhD student Ms Kim Williams. Funded through Ihlein’s ARC DECRA Research Fellowship (2016-19), the research asked how Socially Engaged Art (SEA) can contribute in situations of complex environmental management. The major case study investigated the Queensland sugarcane industry and its relationship with the health of the Great Barrier Reef. </p><p>As a research method, SEA operates in the public sphere beyond academia. <i>Sugar vs the Reef?</i> generated several key events, performances and exhibitions, including <i>Sunset Symphony in the Sunflowers</i> (2017) on a sugarcane farm in Mackay; <i>Watershed Land Art Project</i> (2018-19) at Mackay Regional Botanic Gardens; and <i>Sugar vs the Reef?</i> (2018) at Artspace Mackay.  </p><p>The impact of the project as a whole is demonstrated in the following ways: </p><ul><li><strong>DEVELOPING NEW COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS: </strong><br />The project drew together diverse communities that do not usually interact with each other, and created new partnerships between farming, environmental organisations, and cultural groups; </li><li><strong>DEMONSTRATING EFFICACY OF FARMING METHODS:</strong><br />The project strongly demonstrated the ecological benefits of soil health and regenerative agriculture, using novel modes of engagement on farms and at a botanic gardens site;</li><li><strong>ANALYSIS OF BARRIERS TO BEHAVIOUR CHANGE:</strong><br />The project critically appraised the environmental practices of sugarcane farmers in a high-profile public exhibition;</li><li><strong>MODELLING METHODS OF SLOW ENGAGEMENT IN ART PRACTICE:</strong><br />The project models a method of Socially-Engaged Art practice that engages slowly and respectfully with a set of communities and sites over several years. </li></ul><p><br />Creative arts-based research differs from research in science, agronomy, or sociology, by creating specific events, exhibitions or performances in response to the unfolding site-specific learning. In this case the research centred upon the sugarcane farming community in the city of Mackay, with a special focus on the members of <i>Central Queensland Soil Health Systems</i> - a collective of farmers attempting to transform their own practices for broad ecological benefit. The contribution of SEA research involves artists engaging as ‘non-specialists’ in a complex social/ecological situation, listening to diverse parties and “feeding back” what is learned using novel and performative approaches in the public sphere. </p><p>Central to the project’s impact beyond academia was the deployment of SEA to recognise the creative innovations of this community of farmers, by bringing their work to public attention at the Mackay Regional Botanic Gardens and at Artspace Mackay. As a result of these high-profile public events, the project created a framework for productive partnerships to develop between sugarcane farmers and the local Yuwibara Traditional Owners, the South Sea Islander community, and the non-farming public. </p><p>Outcomes of the project include invitations to the artists and the extended network of farmers involved in the project to present to state and federal MPs, agricultural extension officers, and parliament, as well as international land art specialists in the USA. The project also catalysed myriad related exhibitions, public forums and publications with diverse collaborators in regional NSW, Melbourne, and Queensland. </p>

Available as Research Supervisor

Potential Supervision Topics


  • Socially Engaged Art
    Culture and Environmental Management
    Art and social relations
    Media Arts
    Experimental Film and Video

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Merging asynchronous sounds into synchronous 'voices': Reimagining 'immersion' and 'gathering' in the time of forced isolation — The case of the Adow ne Domaget (Dumagat Day) 2020 KKK radio program-festival
    Doctor of Creative Arts Mystery of the Plinth
    Doctor of Creative Arts A Very Long Echo: Cultural Grief and Embodied Archives Dalziel, Anne Maree
    Doctor of Creative Arts Time of Objects: Haptic perception and embodied film practice Crowe, Rowena

Education And Training


  • Ph.D. in Contemporary Arts, Deakin University, School of Communication and Creative Arts 2005 - 2010

Teaching Overview


  • Dr Ihlein teaches in diverse areas within the creative arts, including socially engaged art, environmental arts, media arts, experimental cinema, and research skills.

Keywords


  • Experimental Cinema
  • Regenerative Agriculture
  • Socially Engaged Art

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Dr Lucas Ihlein is Senior Lecturer in the School of The Arts, English and Media. He uses a creative-practice based research methodology (including blogging, printmaking, public events, and scholarly publication) to explore complex environmental management issues, with a particular focus on Australian agriculture. His  research project: Sugar vs the Reef – Socially Engaged Art and Urgent Environmental Problems was the focus of his ARC DECRA Fellowship from 2016-19.

    Lucas is a member of the following research networks:

Geographic Focus


Has Collaborator


Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • <p><i>Sugar vs the Reef?</i> was a creative arts research project by Dr Lucas Ihlein and PhD student Ms Kim Williams. Funded through Ihlein’s ARC DECRA Research Fellowship (2016-19), the research asked how Socially Engaged Art (SEA) can contribute in situations of complex environmental management. The major case study investigated the Queensland sugarcane industry and its relationship with the health of the Great Barrier Reef. </p><p>As a research method, SEA operates in the public sphere beyond academia. <i>Sugar vs the Reef?</i> generated several key events, performances and exhibitions, including <i>Sunset Symphony in the Sunflowers</i> (2017) on a sugarcane farm in Mackay; <i>Watershed Land Art Project</i> (2018-19) at Mackay Regional Botanic Gardens; and <i>Sugar vs the Reef?</i> (2018) at Artspace Mackay.  </p><p>The impact of the project as a whole is demonstrated in the following ways: </p><ul><li><strong>DEVELOPING NEW COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS: </strong><br />The project drew together diverse communities that do not usually interact with each other, and created new partnerships between farming, environmental organisations, and cultural groups; </li><li><strong>DEMONSTRATING EFFICACY OF FARMING METHODS:</strong><br />The project strongly demonstrated the ecological benefits of soil health and regenerative agriculture, using novel modes of engagement on farms and at a botanic gardens site;</li><li><strong>ANALYSIS OF BARRIERS TO BEHAVIOUR CHANGE:</strong><br />The project critically appraised the environmental practices of sugarcane farmers in a high-profile public exhibition;</li><li><strong>MODELLING METHODS OF SLOW ENGAGEMENT IN ART PRACTICE:</strong><br />The project models a method of Socially-Engaged Art practice that engages slowly and respectfully with a set of communities and sites over several years. </li></ul><p><br />Creative arts-based research differs from research in science, agronomy, or sociology, by creating specific events, exhibitions or performances in response to the unfolding site-specific learning. In this case the research centred upon the sugarcane farming community in the city of Mackay, with a special focus on the members of <i>Central Queensland Soil Health Systems</i> - a collective of farmers attempting to transform their own practices for broad ecological benefit. The contribution of SEA research involves artists engaging as ‘non-specialists’ in a complex social/ecological situation, listening to diverse parties and “feeding back” what is learned using novel and performative approaches in the public sphere. </p><p>Central to the project’s impact beyond academia was the deployment of SEA to recognise the creative innovations of this community of farmers, by bringing their work to public attention at the Mackay Regional Botanic Gardens and at Artspace Mackay. As a result of these high-profile public events, the project created a framework for productive partnerships to develop between sugarcane farmers and the local Yuwibara Traditional Owners, the South Sea Islander community, and the non-farming public. </p><p>Outcomes of the project include invitations to the artists and the extended network of farmers involved in the project to present to state and federal MPs, agricultural extension officers, and parliament, as well as international land art specialists in the USA. The project also catalysed myriad related exhibitions, public forums and publications with diverse collaborators in regional NSW, Melbourne, and Queensland. </p>

Potential Supervision Topics


  • Socially Engaged Art
    Culture and Environmental Management
    Art and social relations
    Media Arts
    Experimental Film and Video

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Merging asynchronous sounds into synchronous 'voices': Reimagining 'immersion' and 'gathering' in the time of forced isolation — The case of the Adow ne Domaget (Dumagat Day) 2020 KKK radio program-festival
    Doctor of Creative Arts Mystery of the Plinth
    Doctor of Creative Arts A Very Long Echo: Cultural Grief and Embodied Archives Dalziel, Anne Maree
    Doctor of Creative Arts Time of Objects: Haptic perception and embodied film practice Crowe, Rowena

Education And Training


  • Ph.D. in Contemporary Arts, Deakin University, School of Communication and Creative Arts 2005 - 2010

Teaching Overview


  • Dr Ihlein teaches in diverse areas within the creative arts, including socially engaged art, environmental arts, media arts, experimental cinema, and research skills.

Keywords


  • Experimental Cinema
  • Regenerative Agriculture
  • Socially Engaged Art

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Geographic Focus