Skip to main content

Moxham, Lorna J. Professor

Professor of Mental Health Nursing and Challenge Leader: Living Well Longer- UOW Global Challenges Program

  • Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health
  • School of Nursing
  • Steering Committee Member - Aged Friendly Illawarra
  • Affiliate Stakeholder Advisory Panel member: Mental Health and the Ageing Brain - Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute
  • Steering Committee member - Illawarra / Shoalhaven Suicide Prevention Collaborative

Overview


Lorna Moxham is the recipient of international and national awards related to her work. She is currently Professor of Mental Health Nursing and the Global Challenges Program challenge leader for Living Well, Longer from 2013 - Jan 2021. Lorna has been a nurse for 41 years, 39 of which she has specialized in mental health. She has clinical, academic and governance experience and  research expertise in nursing education, particularly work integrated learning, mental health and mental illness and qualitative research methodologies. She has published more than 170 papers, chapters and text books and has a strong track record for supervising higher degree students to successful on-time completion. Lorna currently is Non-Executive Director on 2 boards specifically related to mental health.

Lorna is passionate about mental health, and is the co-founder of Recovery Camp, an evidence based award winning psychosocial intervention and educational program. Recovery Camp provides a research based work integrated learning experience for future health professionals and a trauma informed person centred recovery-oriented program for people living with mental illness. The aim of Recovery Camp's research outputs is to enrich student learning experiences, whilst providing meaningful outcomes for people who are living with mental health issues. 

Top Publications


Member Of


Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • <p>Mental illness is a significant burden, impacting individuals (1:4), communities and the health system at large. This project began in 2013 to provide an intervention which seeks to support people with lived experiences of mental illness, while simultaneously educating future health professionals about mental illness. Taking place in a ‘non-traditional’ recovery setting, Recovery Camp brings together people with lived experiences of mental illness (AKA: experts by experience), health students and health professionals to spend 5 days and 4 nights participating in recovery-oriented activities, which are based upon the principles of therapeutic recreation (TR). TR is a process of immersing an individual or group using unique settings and challenging activities to enhance student learning, health and wellness and quality of life <a href="https://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4159/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">(Moxham et al., 2016)</a>. The activities embedded within the Recovery Camp program are challenge by choice and become a catalyst for people to connect with and support others and enhance their strengths<a href="https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5445&context=smhpapers" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> (Moxham et al., 2017)</a>.  The Recovery Camp program is experiential and immersive. People have described it as "life changing". <br /><br />Recovery Camp's approach represents one of equality, respect and connectedness; all camp attendees are contributing in equal measure to the experience, ensuring it is positive for all.  Students learn things they can't learn from books, people with mental illness demonstrate increases in confidence, autonomy and locus of control and carers get a weeks respite. Even clinical facilitators who are responsible for student clinical portfolios whilst at camp, have identified Recovery Camp as a positive means of engaging with students whilst simultaneously being supportive to people with mental illness. All participants are treated with unconditional positive regard with significant impact on all who attend. </p>
  • <p>General practice nurses (GPN) have a key front line role to play in providing integrated healthcare. It was identified that many GPN encounter people with mental health issues in their daily practice, however, the role of a general nurse in mental health was unclear. Providing role clarity by defining the GPNs scope of practice is a powerful tool to reduce role confusion and ambiguity, and optimize GPNs role in improving service delivery to patients. A team of primary care and mental health nurse academics from UOW was funded by the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses, through the Department of Health, to develop mental health practice standards for GPNs. <br />In addition to communicating the role that general nurses can play in mental health within primary care to others, including General Practitioners, policy makers and other health professionals, the Standards provide an important framework for GPNs to assess their individual learning needs in terms of their knowledge and confidence to undertake the identified aspects of the nurses' role. The Australian College of Mental Health Nurses used the Standards to develop CPD eLearning modules and workshops specifically for primary care nurses. These professional development opportunities are targeted to build capacity in areas of practice that have been identified by the Standards as being appropriate for a general nurse in the primary care setting. Each activity empowers GPNs to develop knowledge, skills and confidence about mental health and incorporate these into their day-to-day practice. This has the potential to improve health outcomes as GPNs are empowered to intervene positively when people present to general practice with mental health issues.</p>

Potential Supervision Topics


  • Mental Health Education
    Mental Illness / Mental Health
    Nursing Workforce Development
    Nursing Education

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Using Phenomenology as an Exegesis of the Lived Experience of Mental Illness as it Relates to Therapeutic Recreation. Picton, Caroline
    Doctor of Philosophy Collaborating With Consumers, Carers and Clinicians to Identify Categories of Mental Health Risk Assessment. Aquin, Edward
    Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) How consumer participation in Recovery Camp impacts carers Almoaber, Zahra
    Doctor of Philosophy How Do NPs Conceptualise Resilience Within Their Nursing Practice. Twist, Ida
    Doctor of Philosophy Therapeutic Recreation: The Journey of Therapy Jay, Elissa-Kate

Reviewer Of


Organizer Of Event


Professional Service Activities


Outreach And Community Service Activities


Education And Training


Awards And Honors


Keywords


  • Nursing, Mental health, Mental Health Nursing

Full Name


  • Lorna Jane Moxham

Mailing Address


  • Building 41 - School of Nursing, UOW

    Northfields Avenue

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

Located In Facility


Top Publications


Member Of


Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • <p>Mental illness is a significant burden, impacting individuals (1:4), communities and the health system at large. This project began in 2013 to provide an intervention which seeks to support people with lived experiences of mental illness, while simultaneously educating future health professionals about mental illness. Taking place in a ‘non-traditional’ recovery setting, Recovery Camp brings together people with lived experiences of mental illness (AKA: experts by experience), health students and health professionals to spend 5 days and 4 nights participating in recovery-oriented activities, which are based upon the principles of therapeutic recreation (TR). TR is a process of immersing an individual or group using unique settings and challenging activities to enhance student learning, health and wellness and quality of life <a href="https://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4159/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">(Moxham et al., 2016)</a>. The activities embedded within the Recovery Camp program are challenge by choice and become a catalyst for people to connect with and support others and enhance their strengths<a href="https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5445&context=smhpapers" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> (Moxham et al., 2017)</a>.  The Recovery Camp program is experiential and immersive. People have described it as "life changing". <br /><br />Recovery Camp's approach represents one of equality, respect and connectedness; all camp attendees are contributing in equal measure to the experience, ensuring it is positive for all.  Students learn things they can't learn from books, people with mental illness demonstrate increases in confidence, autonomy and locus of control and carers get a weeks respite. Even clinical facilitators who are responsible for student clinical portfolios whilst at camp, have identified Recovery Camp as a positive means of engaging with students whilst simultaneously being supportive to people with mental illness. All participants are treated with unconditional positive regard with significant impact on all who attend. </p>
  • <p>General practice nurses (GPN) have a key front line role to play in providing integrated healthcare. It was identified that many GPN encounter people with mental health issues in their daily practice, however, the role of a general nurse in mental health was unclear. Providing role clarity by defining the GPNs scope of practice is a powerful tool to reduce role confusion and ambiguity, and optimize GPNs role in improving service delivery to patients. A team of primary care and mental health nurse academics from UOW was funded by the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses, through the Department of Health, to develop mental health practice standards for GPNs. <br />In addition to communicating the role that general nurses can play in mental health within primary care to others, including General Practitioners, policy makers and other health professionals, the Standards provide an important framework for GPNs to assess their individual learning needs in terms of their knowledge and confidence to undertake the identified aspects of the nurses' role. The Australian College of Mental Health Nurses used the Standards to develop CPD eLearning modules and workshops specifically for primary care nurses. These professional development opportunities are targeted to build capacity in areas of practice that have been identified by the Standards as being appropriate for a general nurse in the primary care setting. Each activity empowers GPNs to develop knowledge, skills and confidence about mental health and incorporate these into their day-to-day practice. This has the potential to improve health outcomes as GPNs are empowered to intervene positively when people present to general practice with mental health issues.</p>

Potential Supervision Topics


  • Mental Health Education
    Mental Illness / Mental Health
    Nursing Workforce Development
    Nursing Education

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Using Phenomenology as an Exegesis of the Lived Experience of Mental Illness as it Relates to Therapeutic Recreation. Picton, Caroline
    Doctor of Philosophy Collaborating With Consumers, Carers and Clinicians to Identify Categories of Mental Health Risk Assessment. Aquin, Edward
    Doctor of Philosophy (Integrated) How consumer participation in Recovery Camp impacts carers Almoaber, Zahra
    Doctor of Philosophy How Do NPs Conceptualise Resilience Within Their Nursing Practice. Twist, Ida
    Doctor of Philosophy Therapeutic Recreation: The Journey of Therapy Jay, Elissa-Kate

Reviewer Of


Organizer Of Event


Professional Service Activities


Outreach And Community Service Activities


Education And Training


Awards And Honors


Keywords


  • Nursing, Mental health, Mental Health Nursing

Full Name


  • Lorna Jane Moxham

Mailing Address


  • Building 41 - School of Nursing, UOW

    Northfields Avenue

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

Located In Facility


Geographic Focus