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See, Khay W. Dr.

Senior Research Fellow

  • Australian Institute for Innovative Materials
  • Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials
  • Senior Research Fellow - Australian Institute of Innovative Materials 2012 -

Overview


Dr. Khay See is a senior research fellow at the Australian Institute of Innovative Materials at University of Wollongong, Australia. He has extensive experiences in both industry and academic career that provide him the various platform in engaging his research and development assignment. In his early career, Dr. See was actively engaged in superconductor applications for power utility companies before diving deep into large scale battery energy storage for a wider range of industries. His most notable achievement is the development of advanced battery management system for lithium ion battery pack that utilised in electric automotive and renewable energy storage. He focuses in bringing the gap between the academic research findings and feasible industry solution that in most time researchers are often trapped in the laboratory scale development and theoretical assumptions while practical solutions are yet to be affirm. Dr. See’s expertise and capability has been spread across the country and together with the team effort, he has secured close to $7.5 million industrial research and competitive funding in the past 5 years. Dr See has also co-authored several high quality ranking journal in the relevant fields and persistently contributing technical experiences through invited talks and conferences

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Large scale battery energy storage solution, battery management and control system, mining electrification, power conversion system, underground coal battery application

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • Dr See, who is a senior researcher at the Australian Institute for Innovative Materials (AIIM) believes that while the renewable energy movement is gaining popularity, underground coal mining will remain a backbone for the Australian economy for some time to come. While this provides employment for many Australians, the conditions they work under can be arduous and in many cases dangerous. One of the key dangers faced by workers stems from the use of diesel-powered machinery. <br /><br />The diesel commonly used within mining machinery and transportation vehicles generates diesel particulate matter (DPM). When inhaled DPM can cause a plethora of health problems, including skin irritation, asthma and other respiratory complaints, as well as<a href="http://www.who.int/ipcs/publications/ehc/en/229_part_IV.pdf" target=""> lung cancer</a>. Another common complaint is hearing damage, which can be attributed to noise pollution from loud diesel-powered machines. The confined spaces with minimal ventilation exacerbate the problem. <br /><br />The mining industry understands these are genuine problems for their workforce, and when key stakeholders saw what Dr See and his team were working on, they approached them to help solve the problem. <br /><br />At the time Dr See was working on projects for the Auto Cooperative Research Centre, in which they developed battery management systems to be incorporated into automotive applications. The team successfully built a fully electrified, road-registered car, capable of travelling a good distance on one charge. The mining sector recognised the potential to improve the inefficiencies of their current diesel fleet. <br /><br />The idea of electrifying the diesel fleet in mining isn’t new, with efforts made in the 90s, but with advances in lithium battery technology, it has now become a viable option. Dr See and his team are at the forefront of these specialised innovations and ways to best use the technology in what is sometimes volatile environments. <br /><br />“About two to three years ago, we started to look at using lithium batteries within the mining industry. <br /><br />“The use of them above ground was one thing, but underground was a little different. People are reluctant to test batteries underground due to the presence of methane gas and the sparking and flash mechanism within batteries, which creates a significant chance of explosion.” <br /><br />After travelling to various coal mines around the world and engaging with industry partners, Dr See has overseen the development of a lithium battery which operates within a lightweight explosion-proof housing. <br /><br />“Every researcher works within their own work space and we need to get our products and research out in to the real world, so it isn’t wasted. We need to get their industry specific opinions and ideas, to apply our research to their problems. Only then can we benefit each other equally.” <br /><br />“It is time to transform this industry into a more sustainable one, and by working on the complex problems first, more doors can be opened by developing solutions which can be scaled back to requirements.”

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Master of Philosophy - EIS Embedded Battery Management for Energy Storage and Automotive Applications Hergass, Amit

Professional Service Activities


  • Standards Australia Establishing Standards for Battery Application for Underground Coal Applications 2019 -

Full Name


  • Khay See

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Large scale battery energy storage solution, battery management and control system, mining electrification, power conversion system, underground coal battery application

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • Dr See, who is a senior researcher at the Australian Institute for Innovative Materials (AIIM) believes that while the renewable energy movement is gaining popularity, underground coal mining will remain a backbone for the Australian economy for some time to come. While this provides employment for many Australians, the conditions they work under can be arduous and in many cases dangerous. One of the key dangers faced by workers stems from the use of diesel-powered machinery. <br /><br />The diesel commonly used within mining machinery and transportation vehicles generates diesel particulate matter (DPM). When inhaled DPM can cause a plethora of health problems, including skin irritation, asthma and other respiratory complaints, as well as<a href="http://www.who.int/ipcs/publications/ehc/en/229_part_IV.pdf" target=""> lung cancer</a>. Another common complaint is hearing damage, which can be attributed to noise pollution from loud diesel-powered machines. The confined spaces with minimal ventilation exacerbate the problem. <br /><br />The mining industry understands these are genuine problems for their workforce, and when key stakeholders saw what Dr See and his team were working on, they approached them to help solve the problem. <br /><br />At the time Dr See was working on projects for the Auto Cooperative Research Centre, in which they developed battery management systems to be incorporated into automotive applications. The team successfully built a fully electrified, road-registered car, capable of travelling a good distance on one charge. The mining sector recognised the potential to improve the inefficiencies of their current diesel fleet. <br /><br />The idea of electrifying the diesel fleet in mining isn’t new, with efforts made in the 90s, but with advances in lithium battery technology, it has now become a viable option. Dr See and his team are at the forefront of these specialised innovations and ways to best use the technology in what is sometimes volatile environments. <br /><br />“About two to three years ago, we started to look at using lithium batteries within the mining industry. <br /><br />“The use of them above ground was one thing, but underground was a little different. People are reluctant to test batteries underground due to the presence of methane gas and the sparking and flash mechanism within batteries, which creates a significant chance of explosion.” <br /><br />After travelling to various coal mines around the world and engaging with industry partners, Dr See has overseen the development of a lithium battery which operates within a lightweight explosion-proof housing. <br /><br />“Every researcher works within their own work space and we need to get our products and research out in to the real world, so it isn’t wasted. We need to get their industry specific opinions and ideas, to apply our research to their problems. Only then can we benefit each other equally.” <br /><br />“It is time to transform this industry into a more sustainable one, and by working on the complex problems first, more doors can be opened by developing solutions which can be scaled back to requirements.”

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Master of Philosophy - EIS Embedded Battery Management for Energy Storage and Automotive Applications Hergass, Amit

Professional Service Activities


  • Standards Australia Establishing Standards for Battery Application for Underground Coal Applications 2019 -

Full Name


  • Khay See

Geographic Focus