Raper, Judy A. Prof.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research & Innovation)

  • Division Director for Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems - National Science Foundation - 2007
  • Dean of Engineering - University of Sydney 1997 - 2003

Research Overview



  • Professor Judy Raper was appointed Deputy Vice - Chancellor (Research) in July 2008. Judy previously was the Division Director of Chemical Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport System at NSF. Prior to this secondment, she has been Department Chair, Chemical & Biological Engineering at the Missouri University of Science and Technology (formerly known as University of Missouri-Rolla) (2006) and Dean of Engineering at the University of Sydney (1997-2003). When previously in Australia, she served on the ARC Engineering and Earth Sciences Panel and was founding Director of the Centre for Particle & Catalyst Technologies (now incorporated into the ARC Centre for Functional Nanomaterials) at UNSW. Professor Raper has an impressive research background in chemical engineering and is the recipient of a number of prestigious awards (including the Sheddon Pacific Award for the most outstanding young chemical engineer in Australia in 1992 and the Professional Engineer of the Year in 1998) In 2003 her contribution to the engineering profession in Australia was recognised by election to the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering in Australia and as an Honorary Fellow of the Institution of Engineers Australia.



    Professor Raper followed her undergraduate and PhD degrees from the University of New South Wales with postdoctoral research at the University of Cambridge in the UK, working at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell. She taught at both the University of Newcastle and the University of New South Wales before joining the University of Sydney. Her research interests are focused on particle technology, especially the characterisation of fine particles and how their characteristics affect pollution control and industrial processes. Her recent research has concentrated on characterising inhalant aerosol particles for pharmaceutical and medicinal applications. Her group was responsible for the development of a light scattering technique for the measurement of fractal dimensions of micron-sized aggregates.


Selected Publications


Research Overview



  • Professor Judy Raper was appointed Deputy Vice - Chancellor (Research) in July 2008. Judy previously was the Division Director of Chemical Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport System at NSF. Prior to this secondment, she has been Department Chair, Chemical & Biological Engineering at the Missouri University of Science and Technology (formerly known as University of Missouri-Rolla) (2006) and Dean of Engineering at the University of Sydney (1997-2003). When previously in Australia, she served on the ARC Engineering and Earth Sciences Panel and was founding Director of the Centre for Particle & Catalyst Technologies (now incorporated into the ARC Centre for Functional Nanomaterials) at UNSW. Professor Raper has an impressive research background in chemical engineering and is the recipient of a number of prestigious awards (including the Sheddon Pacific Award for the most outstanding young chemical engineer in Australia in 1992 and the Professional Engineer of the Year in 1998) In 2003 her contribution to the engineering profession in Australia was recognised by election to the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering in Australia and as an Honorary Fellow of the Institution of Engineers Australia.



    Professor Raper followed her undergraduate and PhD degrees from the University of New South Wales with postdoctoral research at the University of Cambridge in the UK, working at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell. She taught at both the University of Newcastle and the University of New South Wales before joining the University of Sydney. Her research interests are focused on particle technology, especially the characterisation of fine particles and how their characteristics affect pollution control and industrial processes. Her recent research has concentrated on characterising inhalant aerosol particles for pharmaceutical and medicinal applications. Her group was responsible for the development of a light scattering technique for the measurement of fractal dimensions of micron-sized aggregates.


Selected Publications


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