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Fisher, Jenny A. A. Prof.

Associate Professor

  • Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry
  • Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health
  • School of Earth, Atmospheric and Life Sciences

Overview


My research centres on investigating the sources, chemical evolution, and transport pathways of atmospheric pollution. I use a global chemical transport model combined with observational data sets (ground-based, aircraft, and satellite) to increase our fundamental understanding of the impacts of human activity and natural processes on atmospheric composition in diverse environments. See more at www.uow.edu.au/~jennyf


Recent group news:
  • Sam Limbrey was awarded a 2019 ACEDD Scholar Award in recognition of his outstanding scholarship in the Bachelor of Science (Honours) - the same week that he submitted his Honours thesis! Congratulations, Sam!
  • Dr Jesse Greenslade has officially completed his PhD. Following an APR internship, he is now a contract employee at the Bureau of Meteorology. Congratulations, Jesse!
  • Dr Bea Bukosa has officially completed her PhD. She is now a postdoc at NIWA in New Zealand. Congratulations Bea!
  • Maria Paula Perez-Peña joins us as a joint PhD student, based primarily in the Kable group at UNSW. Welcome Maria!
  • Our new paper led by former Honours student Kaitlyn Lieschke was published in Geophysical Research Letters.
  • I am honoured to have received 3rd place in the Australian competition for the APEC Science Prize for Innovation, Research and Education (ASPIRE Prize) nomination.
  • PhD student Bea Bukosa’s paper on shipborne measurements of carbon gases is now published in ACP.
  • My new paper on nitrogen cycling over the remote Pacific Ocean is now published in Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres.

Prospective students:
I am always looking for motivated students from diverse backgrounds who are interested in applying their skills to atmospheric chemistry modelling. For more information, please read the Prospective Students section on the Supervision tab.

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • I work collaboratively with colleagues in the Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry at UOW, as well as researchers around the world, to investigate a variety of issues related to atmospheric composition, chemistry, and climate, with particular emphasis on long-range pollution transport.

    Current research interests include:
    • Long-range pollution transport in the southern hemisphere
    • Mercury biogeochemistry in Australia and the Antarctic
    • Biogenic emissions and chemistry in the Southeast US and in Australia
    • Nitrogen chemistry over the remote oceans
    • Atmospheric emissions from electronic waste disposal

Available as Research Supervisor

Selected Publications


Presentations


Impact Story


  • In research published in 2012, my colleagues and I used atmospheric observations from sites across the Arctic to test current understanding of Arctic mercury cycling. From this work, I proposed a new hypothesis: that Arctic rivers provide a very large pulse of mercury to the Arctic Ocean in late spring, which is ultimately responsible for a previously unexplained peak in Arctic atmospheric mercury in summer (<a href="https://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/4665/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Fisher et al., 2012</a>). This work was highlighted in a News and Views piece in Nature Geoscience (<a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/ngeo1508" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Sönke and Heimburger, 2012</a>). My follow-up work then identified solar radiation and air temperature as the major meteorological factors driving Arctic mercury variability (<a href="https://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/1375/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Fisher et al., 2013</a>). This body of work kick-started a community effort to better understand the role of rivers in Arctic mercury cycling (e.g., <a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/es400715r" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Emmerton et al., 2014</a>; <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969715001199?via%3Dihub" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Søngergaard et al., 2015</a>; <a href="https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2015GB005124" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Zhang et al., 2015</a>). Most recently, my Arctic mercury hypothesis provided the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-im-sailing-to-the-arctic-in-search-of-missing-mercury-37310" target="_blank" rel="noopener">motivation</a> for an independent research group to undertake five years of measurements in the Eurasian Arctic to observationally quantify (for the first time ever) the role of rivers in Arctic mercury cycling. Their work provided observational evidence that supports our original hypothesis and “confirms a new Arctic mercury cycling paradigm” (<a href="https://www.pnas.org/content/115/50/E11586" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Sonke et al., 2018</a>).

Available as Research Supervisor

Potential Supervision Topics


  • I am always looking for motivated students interested in applying their skills to atmospheric chemistry modelling. Previous experience with computer programming is useful but not necessary, and I am open to inquiries from students with a background in chemistry, earth science, environmental science, math, physics, computer science (and possibly others!). Women, minorities, and members of other underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply.

    PhD. I am able to accept at most 1 new PhD student each year (as primary supervisor). Prospective students should contact me before applying for admission and funding via the UOW Graduate Research School (due in mid-October). If you are interested in applying, please email me with subject “Prospective PhD Application” and include (1) a cover letter; (2) a short statement of research interests and any prior research experience, including contributions to any presentations or publications; (3) transcripts from undergraduate and (if relevant masters) degrees; (4) contact information for two academic references. For reasons of equity, all applications received by 15 June will be reviewed at the same time (for autumn session start). For mid-year start, please contact me directly to discuss options.

    Honours/MRes. I typically supervise 1-2 UOW honours students from Chemistry or Environmental Science per year. If you are a UOW student interested in an honours project in atmospheric chemistry, please email me to arrange a meeting. If you are a non-UOW student interested in pursuing Honours or MRes at UOW, contact me as early as possible so that we can discuss possibilities.

    Undergraduate Research. I am always open to inquiries from undergraduates interested in research, either during the session or over the summer. Please email me to discuss possible opportunities. I can typically come up with projects to suit students with different backgrounds and levels of experience. Depending on individual circumstances, students may be able to receive coursework credit or wages for participating in research.

    Other opportunities in the Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry can be found at http://smah.uow.edu.au/cac/opportunities/index.html.

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Constraining natural contributions to tropospheric ozone production over Australia and selected areas of the Southern Ocean
    Doctor of Philosophy Using Measurements and Modelling to Quantify Hg Biogeochemical Cycling in the Australian Context Page, Neil
    Doctor of Philosophy Improving our knowledge of biogenic volatile organic compounds concentration and emission in the Sydney Basin Region Ramirez Gamboa, Jhonathan
    Doctor of Philosophy Investigating the controls on the extent of tidewater glaciers using climate reanalysis Koenigseder, Sandra
    Master of Research -SMAH Southern Hemisphere Air Pollution Transport Sheridan, Lily

Reviewer Of


Professional Service Activities


Education And Training


  • Ph.D. in Earth & Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Earth & Planetary Sciences, Thesis: Atmospheric pollution in the Arctic: sources, transport, and chemical processing 2011
  • Sc.M. in Engineering Sciences, Harvard University, Earth & Planetary Sciences 2009
  • B.S. in Planetary Science, California Institute of Technology, Geological & Planetary Sciences, with honors 2005

Keywords


  • atmospheric chemistry
  • atmospheric composition
  • chemical transport modelling
  • mercury biogeochemistry
  • tropospheric chemistry

Full Name


  • Jenny A. Fisher

Mailing Address


  • University of Wollongong

    Northfields Avenue

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2500

    Australia

Web Of Science Researcher Id


  • J-3979-2012

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • I work collaboratively with colleagues in the Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry at UOW, as well as researchers around the world, to investigate a variety of issues related to atmospheric composition, chemistry, and climate, with particular emphasis on long-range pollution transport.

    Current research interests include:
    • Long-range pollution transport in the southern hemisphere
    • Mercury biogeochemistry in Australia and the Antarctic
    • Biogenic emissions and chemistry in the Southeast US and in Australia
    • Nitrogen chemistry over the remote oceans
    • Atmospheric emissions from electronic waste disposal

Selected Publications


Presentations


Impact Story


  • In research published in 2012, my colleagues and I used atmospheric observations from sites across the Arctic to test current understanding of Arctic mercury cycling. From this work, I proposed a new hypothesis: that Arctic rivers provide a very large pulse of mercury to the Arctic Ocean in late spring, which is ultimately responsible for a previously unexplained peak in Arctic atmospheric mercury in summer (<a href="https://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/4665/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Fisher et al., 2012</a>). This work was highlighted in a News and Views piece in Nature Geoscience (<a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/ngeo1508" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Sönke and Heimburger, 2012</a>). My follow-up work then identified solar radiation and air temperature as the major meteorological factors driving Arctic mercury variability (<a href="https://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/1375/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Fisher et al., 2013</a>). This body of work kick-started a community effort to better understand the role of rivers in Arctic mercury cycling (e.g., <a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/es400715r" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Emmerton et al., 2014</a>; <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969715001199?via%3Dihub" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Søngergaard et al., 2015</a>; <a href="https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2015GB005124" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Zhang et al., 2015</a>). Most recently, my Arctic mercury hypothesis provided the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-im-sailing-to-the-arctic-in-search-of-missing-mercury-37310" target="_blank" rel="noopener">motivation</a> for an independent research group to undertake five years of measurements in the Eurasian Arctic to observationally quantify (for the first time ever) the role of rivers in Arctic mercury cycling. Their work provided observational evidence that supports our original hypothesis and “confirms a new Arctic mercury cycling paradigm” (<a href="https://www.pnas.org/content/115/50/E11586" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Sonke et al., 2018</a>).

Potential Supervision Topics


  • I am always looking for motivated students interested in applying their skills to atmospheric chemistry modelling. Previous experience with computer programming is useful but not necessary, and I am open to inquiries from students with a background in chemistry, earth science, environmental science, math, physics, computer science (and possibly others!). Women, minorities, and members of other underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply.

    PhD. I am able to accept at most 1 new PhD student each year (as primary supervisor). Prospective students should contact me before applying for admission and funding via the UOW Graduate Research School (due in mid-October). If you are interested in applying, please email me with subject “Prospective PhD Application” and include (1) a cover letter; (2) a short statement of research interests and any prior research experience, including contributions to any presentations or publications; (3) transcripts from undergraduate and (if relevant masters) degrees; (4) contact information for two academic references. For reasons of equity, all applications received by 15 June will be reviewed at the same time (for autumn session start). For mid-year start, please contact me directly to discuss options.

    Honours/MRes. I typically supervise 1-2 UOW honours students from Chemistry or Environmental Science per year. If you are a UOW student interested in an honours project in atmospheric chemistry, please email me to arrange a meeting. If you are a non-UOW student interested in pursuing Honours or MRes at UOW, contact me as early as possible so that we can discuss possibilities.

    Undergraduate Research. I am always open to inquiries from undergraduates interested in research, either during the session or over the summer. Please email me to discuss possible opportunities. I can typically come up with projects to suit students with different backgrounds and levels of experience. Depending on individual circumstances, students may be able to receive coursework credit or wages for participating in research.

    Other opportunities in the Centre for Atmospheric Chemistry can be found at http://smah.uow.edu.au/cac/opportunities/index.html.

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Constraining natural contributions to tropospheric ozone production over Australia and selected areas of the Southern Ocean
    Doctor of Philosophy Using Measurements and Modelling to Quantify Hg Biogeochemical Cycling in the Australian Context Page, Neil
    Doctor of Philosophy Improving our knowledge of biogenic volatile organic compounds concentration and emission in the Sydney Basin Region Ramirez Gamboa, Jhonathan
    Doctor of Philosophy Investigating the controls on the extent of tidewater glaciers using climate reanalysis Koenigseder, Sandra
    Master of Research -SMAH Southern Hemisphere Air Pollution Transport Sheridan, Lily

Reviewer Of


Professional Service Activities


Education And Training


  • Ph.D. in Earth & Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Earth & Planetary Sciences, Thesis: Atmospheric pollution in the Arctic: sources, transport, and chemical processing 2011
  • Sc.M. in Engineering Sciences, Harvard University, Earth & Planetary Sciences 2009
  • B.S. in Planetary Science, California Institute of Technology, Geological & Planetary Sciences, with honors 2005

Keywords


  • atmospheric chemistry
  • atmospheric composition
  • chemical transport modelling
  • mercury biogeochemistry
  • tropospheric chemistry

Full Name


  • Jenny A. Fisher

Mailing Address


  • University of Wollongong

    Northfields Avenue

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2500

    Australia

Web Of Science Researcher Id


  • J-3979-2012