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Dr Foroughi, Javad ARC Research Fellow

Senior Research Fellow

  • Australian Institute for Innovative Materials
  • Intelligent Polymer Research Institute

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Javad Foroughi is a Senior Research Fellow at Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, University of Wollongong and a recipient of Australian Research Council DECRA Fellowship. Dr Foroughi received the B.S. and MS degree in Engineering (Fibre Science - Textile Chemistry) in 1997 Iran and the PhD degree in Material Engineering from School of Mechanical, Materials, Mechatronic and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wollongong, Australia in 2009. Dr Foroughi has pioneered the field of electrofunctional materials and he is widely acknowledged as the inventor of electrochemical torsional actuators based on carbon nanotube yarn (published in Science 2011). His research focuses on the development of electrofunctional nano-materials for actuation, sensing, smart textiles and energy conversion. Dr Foroughi is a pioneer in the field of nanotechnology whose current research focuses in part on developing new technologies for harvesting and storing energy, new types of artificial muscles, the fabrication, characterization and application of carbon nanotube, graphene yarns, sensors, new material synthesis, and fundamental structure-properties relationships for materials. Dr Foroughi has published more than 150 articles and a growing national and international recognition through various awards and invited presentations. In addition Dr Foroughi has supervised 15 PhD students.


    Current Research

    1. Design and fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds with complex 3D architectures and customized chemistry that mimic the in vivo tissue environment for drug delivery applications
    2. Developing energy materials for Artificial Muscles, Smart Textiles and Wearable Technologies

Available for Collaborative Projects

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • <a href="https://ihmri.uow.edu.au/about-ihmri/news/UOW228108.html" title="SPINNING A CLEVER YARN" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ARTIFICIAL MUSCLES NO LONGER THE REALM OF SCIENCE FICTION</a>
  • <p>Customers buying the finest wool-based clothing can confirm they’re getting what they paid for, thanks to technology developed by University of Wollongong (UOW) researchers, with the support of the NSW Government.</p><p>Mittagong-based Bluey Merino has developed a Near Field Communications (NFC) label with the University to incorporate in its range of active and outdoor wear made with the softest rare grade, super-fine merino wool. Customers can scan the label with their mobile phones to confirm the origin of the wool in their new garment.</p><p>Bluey Merino worked with the University of Wollongong as part of the NSW Government’s $18 million <a href="http://www.industry.nsw.gov.au/business-and-industry-in-nsw" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Boosting Business Innovation Program</a> to open up university research centres to local companies.</p><p>“This is an outstanding example of a local company working with our university sector through the Boost program to deliver a true ‘value-add’ for our regional primary industry sector,” Deputy Premier and Minister for Industry John Barilaro said.</p><p>“Throughout the world NSW products are renowned for their high quality so it’s critical that we guard against their counterfeiting with technology that guarantees their provenance.<br /><a href="https://www.uow.edu.au/media/2019/uow-developed-wearable-tech-to-beat-foreign-fakes.php" title=" UOW developed wearable tech to beat foreign fakes" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Researchers work with Mittagong company to develop counterfeit-proof garments</a></p><p><br />UOW research lead Dr <a href="display/javad_foroughi" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Javad Foroughi</a> said, “It has been a pleasure to collaborate with Andrew and to apply breakthrough research to real world problems. It also gave the PhD students a chance to interact with industry.”</p><p>Bluey Merino’s next step is to develop body-sensing capabilities within their garments to monitor the wearer’s vitals such as blood pressure and temperature, with applications in fields including athletics, defence, healthcare and aged care.</p><p>The Boosting Business Innovation Program connects the state’s businesses with the NSW university sector’s research and testing capabilities, helping push the development of new products and services and further strengthening the NSW economy.</p>
  • <a href="https://media.uow.edu.au/news/UOW256921.html" title="NSW Chief Scientist and Engineer Professor Hugh Durrant-Whyte (right) with ARC Research Fellow Dr Javad Foroughi" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><br /><br />IPRI research strengths on display for NSW Chief Scientist and Engineer</a>
  • <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQjXQJA3_W8" title="Dr Foroughi explained his discovery " target="_blank" rel="noopener">Win TV interview with Dr Foroughi</a>
  • <p>An interdisciplinary research team involving expertise from the Faculty of Engineering and Information Systems, the Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts, and the Australian Institute of Innovative Materials, is working towards the development of a ‘Smart Garment’.</p><p>Funded by the Global Challenges program the project is investigating the feasibility of incorporating antenna arrays within garments for localisation and tracking, health monitoring, as well as signalling the provenance of the garment.</p><p>The antenna array is envisaged to harvest energy from a probing signal and then send back the relevant information using this energy.</p><p>This information can be used to monitor and track the status and distribution of mining personnel for example, in locations where GPS or traditional location-based systems do not operate. In particular, and of critical importance to Australia, the radiation signature of a (unique) pattern of antennas incorporated into the fabric may be used to signal provenance.</p><p>“Unlike the existing methods, such as attaching a tag, the information is built into the pattern of yarns and counterfeiting is extremely difficult,” says Prof. Safaei.</p><p>This allows Australian producers to differentiate themselves from (cheap) imitations and tap into a socially and environmentally conscious market segment that is likely to show significant loyalty to the brand. </p><p>“This project is a first for our team. We have done all the fundamental work and are now developing the prototype device.” Said Dr Foroughi<em>.<br /><a href="https://www.uow.edu.au/research/newsletter/2019/UOW258335.html" title="Garments for real-time communication, localisation, tracking and provenance" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Smart Garment Project</a><br /></em></p>
  • <p>Putting ‘socks’ on helps artificial muscles made from inexpensive materials produce 40 times more flex than human muscle, a global research project has found, featuring researchers from the University of Wollongong (UOW).</p><p>Researchers at UOW’s Intelligent Polymer Research Institute including Professor Geoff Spinks, Dr Javad Foroughi, Dharshika Kongahage and Sepehr Talebian, joined with international partners from the USA, China and South Korea to develop sheath-run artificial muscles (SRAMs), that can be used to create intelligent materials and fabrics that react by sensing the environment around them.</p><p> Lead Australian researcher and ARC-DECRA Fellow Dr Javad Foroughi said these new muscles build on the team’s work over the past 15 years in artificial muscle performance.</p><p> “I discovered as part of my PhD project that giant torsional actuation in twisted carbon nanotube yarns can be used as artificial muscles, and since then Professor Spinks and I have been working on a new generation of artificial muscles that furthers this research,” Javad said.</p><p> “This will be our fourth paper published in Science since this discovery in 2008, which is incredibly exciting and great recognition for the team and the potential for real applications these artificial muscles hold.”</p><p> The sheath-run artificial muscles feature a sheath around a coiled or twisted yarn, which contracts, or actuates, when heated, and returns to its initial state when cooled. The outside sheath absorbs energy and drives actuation of the muscle. The muscles can also operate by absorbing moisture from their surroundings.</p><p> The new SRAMs are made from common natural and man-made fibres, such as cotton, silk, wool and nylon, which are cheap and readily available.</p><p> Dr Foroughi  explained that the application possibilities for SRAMs are diverse.</p><p> “When we talk artificial muscles, we’re not just talking about a technology as a replacement for muscles in the body. These muscles offer some exciting opportunities for technologies where the artificial muscles intelligently actuate by sensing their environment,” Dr Foroughi said.</p><p> </p><p>“Picture these muscles being woven into comfort-adjusting textiles that cool in summer and warm in winter depending on their exposure to temperature, moisture (like sweat), and sunlight, or as smart controlled drug release devices for localised delivery through the actuation of valves that control the flow of liquids depending on their chemical composition or temperature.”</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>This work is <a href="https://science.sciencemag.org/content/365/6449/150" target="_blank" rel="noopener">published in the journal Science</a>, and includes collaboration by the University of Wollongong, The University of Texas at Dallas (USA), Donghua University (China), and Hanyang University (South Korea).</p><a href="https://www.uow.edu.au/media/2019/breakthrough-gives-artificial-muscles-superhuman-strength.php" title="UOW researchers in global collaboration to develop exciting new material" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><br /><br /><br /><br />https://www.uow.edu.au/media/2019/breakthrough-gives-artificial-muscles-superhuman-strength.php<br /></a>
  • <a href="https://scout.tveyes.com/media/255337/AURADABCILLAWARRA/2018-02-23/16/40/44/?ua=1&StartOffset=0&eventid=eda406a9-89ca-4042-bb09-a3cb1fea1b2e&Highlight=&signature=50450B518DFA4767E55175AFAD8C9CEC" title="Smart Textile" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ABC interview</a>
  • <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLTHw4740kA" title="ABC Show Catalyst" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Artificial Muscles from Fishing line<br /><br /></a>
  • <a href="https://www.blueymerino.com/blog/merino-product-innovation/" title="Going Slow before you can Grow Fast" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NSW COMPANY’S WEARABLE TECH TO BEAT FOREIGN FAKES</a>
  • THAT’S DESPITE THREE DECADES OF RESEARCH INTO THE DISEASE<br /><br /><strong>A team of IHMRI researchers and clinicians are studying a new drug delivery system to reduce cancer cells and improve the chances of life-saving surgery for patients.</strong><a href="https://ihmri.uow.edu.au/about-ihmri/news/UOW240766.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">New Drug Delivery <br /></a><br />

Potential Supervision Topics


  • Smart Materials, Smart Textile, Carbon Nanotube, Artificial Muscles, Biomedical materials, wearable technology 

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Artificial Muscles for Smart Textiles and Healthcare Kongahage, Dharshika
    Doctor of Philosophy Self-powered smart fabrics for wearable technologies. Mokhtari, Fatemeh
    Doctor of Philosophy Drug Loaded Coaxial Hydrogel Fibers as Drug Delivery Deports for Cancer Treatment Talebian, Sepehr
    Doctor of Philosophy Development and preclinical evaluation of implantable polymeric structures for local drug delivery in pancreatic cancer Wade, Samantha

Outreach Overview


  • Dr Foroughi is an internationally renowned researcher with innovative research work in smart materials, graphene and carbon nanotubes for emerging advanced application. He has made significant contributions to the intelligent materials science and energy materials field. He has attained significant recognition internationally in the Smart Textile research community due to his large body of innovative research work on intelligent polymers and carbon nanotubes fibers. His research on torsional carbon nanotube Artificial Muscles and Wearable Technologies have created new knowledge discovery which was published in the prestigious journal of Science in 2011 and a growing national and international recognition through various awards and invited presentations. His accomplishments include an ARC DECRA Fellowship award, a proven record of 150 refereed publications in top ranked journals including four papers in the prestigious journal of Science.

Keywords


  • Smart Textiles, Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene, Biomaterials,  Implantable Drug Delivery Systems, Wearable Technology 

Full Name


  • Dr Javad Foroughi

Mailing Address


  • University of Wollongong Australia

    Northfiled Ave.

    Wollongong

    New South Wales

    2500

    Australia

Web Of Science Researcher Id


  • A-1439-2012

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Javad Foroughi is a Senior Research Fellow at Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, University of Wollongong and a recipient of Australian Research Council DECRA Fellowship. Dr Foroughi received the B.S. and MS degree in Engineering (Fibre Science - Textile Chemistry) in 1997 Iran and the PhD degree in Material Engineering from School of Mechanical, Materials, Mechatronic and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wollongong, Australia in 2009. Dr Foroughi has pioneered the field of electrofunctional materials and he is widely acknowledged as the inventor of electrochemical torsional actuators based on carbon nanotube yarn (published in Science 2011). His research focuses on the development of electrofunctional nano-materials for actuation, sensing, smart textiles and energy conversion. Dr Foroughi is a pioneer in the field of nanotechnology whose current research focuses in part on developing new technologies for harvesting and storing energy, new types of artificial muscles, the fabrication, characterization and application of carbon nanotube, graphene yarns, sensors, new material synthesis, and fundamental structure-properties relationships for materials. Dr Foroughi has published more than 150 articles and a growing national and international recognition through various awards and invited presentations. In addition Dr Foroughi has supervised 15 PhD students.


    Current Research

    1. Design and fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds with complex 3D architectures and customized chemistry that mimic the in vivo tissue environment for drug delivery applications
    2. Developing energy materials for Artificial Muscles, Smart Textiles and Wearable Technologies

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • <a href="https://ihmri.uow.edu.au/about-ihmri/news/UOW228108.html" title="SPINNING A CLEVER YARN" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ARTIFICIAL MUSCLES NO LONGER THE REALM OF SCIENCE FICTION</a>
  • <p>Customers buying the finest wool-based clothing can confirm they’re getting what they paid for, thanks to technology developed by University of Wollongong (UOW) researchers, with the support of the NSW Government.</p><p>Mittagong-based Bluey Merino has developed a Near Field Communications (NFC) label with the University to incorporate in its range of active and outdoor wear made with the softest rare grade, super-fine merino wool. Customers can scan the label with their mobile phones to confirm the origin of the wool in their new garment.</p><p>Bluey Merino worked with the University of Wollongong as part of the NSW Government’s $18 million <a href="http://www.industry.nsw.gov.au/business-and-industry-in-nsw" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Boosting Business Innovation Program</a> to open up university research centres to local companies.</p><p>“This is an outstanding example of a local company working with our university sector through the Boost program to deliver a true ‘value-add’ for our regional primary industry sector,” Deputy Premier and Minister for Industry John Barilaro said.</p><p>“Throughout the world NSW products are renowned for their high quality so it’s critical that we guard against their counterfeiting with technology that guarantees their provenance.<br /><a href="https://www.uow.edu.au/media/2019/uow-developed-wearable-tech-to-beat-foreign-fakes.php" title=" UOW developed wearable tech to beat foreign fakes" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Researchers work with Mittagong company to develop counterfeit-proof garments</a></p><p><br />UOW research lead Dr <a href="display/javad_foroughi" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Javad Foroughi</a> said, “It has been a pleasure to collaborate with Andrew and to apply breakthrough research to real world problems. It also gave the PhD students a chance to interact with industry.”</p><p>Bluey Merino’s next step is to develop body-sensing capabilities within their garments to monitor the wearer’s vitals such as blood pressure and temperature, with applications in fields including athletics, defence, healthcare and aged care.</p><p>The Boosting Business Innovation Program connects the state’s businesses with the NSW university sector’s research and testing capabilities, helping push the development of new products and services and further strengthening the NSW economy.</p>
  • <a href="https://media.uow.edu.au/news/UOW256921.html" title="NSW Chief Scientist and Engineer Professor Hugh Durrant-Whyte (right) with ARC Research Fellow Dr Javad Foroughi" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><br /><br />IPRI research strengths on display for NSW Chief Scientist and Engineer</a>
  • <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQjXQJA3_W8" title="Dr Foroughi explained his discovery " target="_blank" rel="noopener">Win TV interview with Dr Foroughi</a>
  • <p>An interdisciplinary research team involving expertise from the Faculty of Engineering and Information Systems, the Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts, and the Australian Institute of Innovative Materials, is working towards the development of a ‘Smart Garment’.</p><p>Funded by the Global Challenges program the project is investigating the feasibility of incorporating antenna arrays within garments for localisation and tracking, health monitoring, as well as signalling the provenance of the garment.</p><p>The antenna array is envisaged to harvest energy from a probing signal and then send back the relevant information using this energy.</p><p>This information can be used to monitor and track the status and distribution of mining personnel for example, in locations where GPS or traditional location-based systems do not operate. In particular, and of critical importance to Australia, the radiation signature of a (unique) pattern of antennas incorporated into the fabric may be used to signal provenance.</p><p>“Unlike the existing methods, such as attaching a tag, the information is built into the pattern of yarns and counterfeiting is extremely difficult,” says Prof. Safaei.</p><p>This allows Australian producers to differentiate themselves from (cheap) imitations and tap into a socially and environmentally conscious market segment that is likely to show significant loyalty to the brand. </p><p>“This project is a first for our team. We have done all the fundamental work and are now developing the prototype device.” Said Dr Foroughi<em>.<br /><a href="https://www.uow.edu.au/research/newsletter/2019/UOW258335.html" title="Garments for real-time communication, localisation, tracking and provenance" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Smart Garment Project</a><br /></em></p>
  • <p>Putting ‘socks’ on helps artificial muscles made from inexpensive materials produce 40 times more flex than human muscle, a global research project has found, featuring researchers from the University of Wollongong (UOW).</p><p>Researchers at UOW’s Intelligent Polymer Research Institute including Professor Geoff Spinks, Dr Javad Foroughi, Dharshika Kongahage and Sepehr Talebian, joined with international partners from the USA, China and South Korea to develop sheath-run artificial muscles (SRAMs), that can be used to create intelligent materials and fabrics that react by sensing the environment around them.</p><p> Lead Australian researcher and ARC-DECRA Fellow Dr Javad Foroughi said these new muscles build on the team’s work over the past 15 years in artificial muscle performance.</p><p> “I discovered as part of my PhD project that giant torsional actuation in twisted carbon nanotube yarns can be used as artificial muscles, and since then Professor Spinks and I have been working on a new generation of artificial muscles that furthers this research,” Javad said.</p><p> “This will be our fourth paper published in Science since this discovery in 2008, which is incredibly exciting and great recognition for the team and the potential for real applications these artificial muscles hold.”</p><p> The sheath-run artificial muscles feature a sheath around a coiled or twisted yarn, which contracts, or actuates, when heated, and returns to its initial state when cooled. The outside sheath absorbs energy and drives actuation of the muscle. The muscles can also operate by absorbing moisture from their surroundings.</p><p> The new SRAMs are made from common natural and man-made fibres, such as cotton, silk, wool and nylon, which are cheap and readily available.</p><p> Dr Foroughi  explained that the application possibilities for SRAMs are diverse.</p><p> “When we talk artificial muscles, we’re not just talking about a technology as a replacement for muscles in the body. These muscles offer some exciting opportunities for technologies where the artificial muscles intelligently actuate by sensing their environment,” Dr Foroughi said.</p><p> </p><p>“Picture these muscles being woven into comfort-adjusting textiles that cool in summer and warm in winter depending on their exposure to temperature, moisture (like sweat), and sunlight, or as smart controlled drug release devices for localised delivery through the actuation of valves that control the flow of liquids depending on their chemical composition or temperature.”</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>This work is <a href="https://science.sciencemag.org/content/365/6449/150" target="_blank" rel="noopener">published in the journal Science</a>, and includes collaboration by the University of Wollongong, The University of Texas at Dallas (USA), Donghua University (China), and Hanyang University (South Korea).</p><a href="https://www.uow.edu.au/media/2019/breakthrough-gives-artificial-muscles-superhuman-strength.php" title="UOW researchers in global collaboration to develop exciting new material" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><br /><br /><br /><br />https://www.uow.edu.au/media/2019/breakthrough-gives-artificial-muscles-superhuman-strength.php<br /></a>
  • <a href="https://scout.tveyes.com/media/255337/AURADABCILLAWARRA/2018-02-23/16/40/44/?ua=1&StartOffset=0&eventid=eda406a9-89ca-4042-bb09-a3cb1fea1b2e&Highlight=&signature=50450B518DFA4767E55175AFAD8C9CEC" title="Smart Textile" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ABC interview</a>
  • <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLTHw4740kA" title="ABC Show Catalyst" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Artificial Muscles from Fishing line<br /><br /></a>
  • <a href="https://www.blueymerino.com/blog/merino-product-innovation/" title="Going Slow before you can Grow Fast" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NSW COMPANY’S WEARABLE TECH TO BEAT FOREIGN FAKES</a>
  • THAT’S DESPITE THREE DECADES OF RESEARCH INTO THE DISEASE<br /><br /><strong>A team of IHMRI researchers and clinicians are studying a new drug delivery system to reduce cancer cells and improve the chances of life-saving surgery for patients.</strong><a href="https://ihmri.uow.edu.au/about-ihmri/news/UOW240766.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">New Drug Delivery <br /></a><br />

Potential Supervision Topics


  • Smart Materials, Smart Textile, Carbon Nanotube, Artificial Muscles, Biomedical materials, wearable technology 

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Artificial Muscles for Smart Textiles and Healthcare Kongahage, Dharshika
    Doctor of Philosophy Self-powered smart fabrics for wearable technologies. Mokhtari, Fatemeh
    Doctor of Philosophy Drug Loaded Coaxial Hydrogel Fibers as Drug Delivery Deports for Cancer Treatment Talebian, Sepehr
    Doctor of Philosophy Development and preclinical evaluation of implantable polymeric structures for local drug delivery in pancreatic cancer Wade, Samantha

Outreach Overview


  • Dr Foroughi is an internationally renowned researcher with innovative research work in smart materials, graphene and carbon nanotubes for emerging advanced application. He has made significant contributions to the intelligent materials science and energy materials field. He has attained significant recognition internationally in the Smart Textile research community due to his large body of innovative research work on intelligent polymers and carbon nanotubes fibers. His research on torsional carbon nanotube Artificial Muscles and Wearable Technologies have created new knowledge discovery which was published in the prestigious journal of Science in 2011 and a growing national and international recognition through various awards and invited presentations. His accomplishments include an ARC DECRA Fellowship award, a proven record of 150 refereed publications in top ranked journals including four papers in the prestigious journal of Science.

Keywords


  • Smart Textiles, Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene, Biomaterials,  Implantable Drug Delivery Systems, Wearable Technology 

Full Name


  • Dr Javad Foroughi

Mailing Address


  • University of Wollongong Australia

    Northfiled Ave.

    Wollongong

    New South Wales

    2500

    Australia

Web Of Science Researcher Id


  • A-1439-2012

Geographic Focus