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Hasan, Helen M. Prof

Professor Information Systems

  • Researcher - Australian Health Services Research Institute
  • Founding Director - Living Connected 2016 -

Overview


 Prof Helen Hasan consults, investigates and  publishes extensively in Information Systems and related areas of Knowledge Management and Human Computer Interaction while managing a Usability Laboratory (ATUL) at the university  Using frameworks based on Complex and Activity Theories her research falls into two  themes: the  Grey and the Green. Her Grey projects investigate the use of IT by the elderly for their social wellbeing. Her ‘Green’ theme takes a holistic approach to IS support for sustainable development. Helen leads national and international special interest groups on Green IS. Helen has received the University Award for Research Student Supervisor of the Year (2012), for Interdisciplinary Research Excellence (2015) and for for Community Engagement (2017). Helen's latest venture is a start-up social business, Living Connected, resident  at iAccelerate which assists older people to use computers and remain digitally included in modern society.

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Following an early distinguished career in Physics, I became attracted to the evolution of digital technologies and transferred to the discipline of Information Systems (IS) when I moved to Wollongong in 1986.  I am now an internationally recognised senior scholar in IS and the related fields of Knowledge Management (KM) and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Research topics in these 3 fields are interconnected, multidisciplinary, socio-technical and globally important.  In my membership of the Association for Information Systems (AIS), the international body for IS academics, I provide service to the discipline with other leaders in the field, establishing the Special Interest Group in Green IS, chairing the AIS Outreach Task Force  and editing special issues of journals in the AIS basket.

    The discipline of IS encompasses future-focused and fast-moving topics related to the development, use and impact of digital technologies. I have demonstrated expertise in researching topics known as Grand Challenges by taking a holistic investigative approach with innovative theories and methods. As significant citations to many of my papers show, I am internationally recognised as an authority on Activity and Complexity Theories as well as interpretive qualitative methodologies that are appropriate for applying these theories in cross-disciplinary.  I received the VC's Award for Interdisciplinary Research Excellence in 2015 and for Community Engagement in 2017.

    Among the Grand Challenges on which my research projects focusI am known internationally for leadership in the new field of Green IS and for expertise on Strategic Information Systems for Complex Decision Support (my PhD topic). Nationally, I am known for my action research on the use of computers by the elderly to improve their independence and wellbeing. I plan to commercialise this program as a Social Business service to isolated elderly in the community through iAccelerate.

    I have demonstrated expertise in research management bringing in $578,509 in competitive research grants and $192,364 in research consulting. I was lead CI on two ARC Discovery funded projects which involved a partnership with DSTO with impact on the Department of Defence. I also have long standing cooperative engagement with Standards Australia and CSIRO. I have presented seminars and workshops at IS Schools in Australian and in the USA, UK, Germany, Lichtenstein, the Middle East and Asia. I have given Keynotes at 5 national and 1 international conferences.

    I have been employed at UOW for 30 years developing my research impact and leadership capability. Over this time I have positively influenced the careers of 100s of staff whom I have mentored and HDR students whom I have supervised. I continue to work with many former IS staff and students. 10 of my journal articles and 17 conference papers are co-authored with my former HDR students. Some of my 30 completed HDR graduates are now professors themselves at universities in many countries including the Australian G8.  At UOW I am regularly nominated for supervisor of the year and, in 2012, received the VC's award for HDR Supervision Excellence.

     

Selected Publications


Investigator On


Impact Story


  • <p><a href="http://livingconnected.org.au/" title="Living Connected Website" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Living Connected</a> has created a service to improve the digital literacy of older citizens who live in the Illawarra-Shoalhaven.<em>  </em>This service applies the results of four year's research into why and how older people use digital devices and on the benefits to social well-being from this use.</p><p>As developed countries struggle to find suitable living arrangements for their ageing populations, many elderly citizens are becoming increasingly marginalized and isolated. Isolation is known to lead to severe problems such as depression. There is a large body of evidence that remaining active and are major contributors to health and wellbeing of the elderly. With age, the physical capability to get out and about diminishes. Meanwhile, digital technology continues to improve, providing new ways to connect with others and engage in exciting new activities.</p><p>The most recent Telstra report on digital inclusion in Australia reveals that older citizens are missing out on the benefits of the Internet; something that the rest of us take for granted. Government agencies, businesses and community services expect everyone to interact with them online and are making it difficult to access service in personal. This is a real challenge for the digitally excluded.</p><p>The mission of Living Connected is to be a not-for profit community enterprise providing services for the social well-being of elders assisting them to set up and use a computer whereby they remain independent, connected and engaged.  Research into the outcomes of social services has identified eight domains of wellbeing, three of which are on a higher level than the others: maintaining independence, staying connected and being able to engage in meaningful activities. Our research has demonstrated ways by which computers can be used to improve well-being in these domains; maintaining independence by doing banking and other transactions online; connecting with family and friends through email. Skype, and Facebook and spending spare time sdoing an online  course or your familiar history and much more.</p><p>Our research revealed the importance of (1) focussing on 1 or 2 things that each person wants to do. (2) getting the best technology for each person and what they want (3) getting a few 1-on-1 lessons on their own device, just enough to do the one thing they want to do most and (4) having someone they can call on for help when they get stuck.</p><p>Our biggest challenge is to build up a viable and sustainable social business where those who can pay for services but no-one misses out.  We have seed funding from NBNCo and Telstra; help from iAccelerate; and a great team, many of whom are volunteers.</p>
  • <p>Alongside the demographic aging of the population, there is a corresponding increase in the number of people living with dementia. International estimates are 46 million, with this number expected to rise to 138 million by 2050 (ADI, 2016). The increasing prevalence of dementia will demand a shift in both the social and the physical environments within which we live. Low levels of public understanding can contribute to the fear, stigma and social exclusion associated with living with dementia. Public spaces and civic buildings are not often designed in ways which are supportive of people with dementia participating in civic life. ‘Dementia friendly’ communities aim to address this by empowering people with dementia and increasing their social inclusion. They also aim to create more supportive physical environment to enable participation.</p><p>The ‘Dementia Friendly Kiama’ project (led by Dr Lyn Phillipson) and colleagues from UOW (Brennan-Horley, Fleming, Cridland, Hall and Hasan) is a partnership between the University of Wollongong (UOW) Global Challenges Program, the Kiama Municipal Council, the Kiama community and Dementia Australia. The project utilises a Community-based Participatory Action Research framework to inform the development, implementation and evaluation of a multicomponent dementia-friendly community intervention.  Research in Kiama has included interviews and mapping exercises with people with dementia and their carers, community and business surveys, piloting a Dementia-friendly business toolkit and the development of an environmental assessment tool for use in the auditing of public buildings. Formative research activities guided the Action Plan of a local Dementia Alliance and Dementia Advisory Group. Evaluative research activities monitor inputs, outputs, impacts and outcomes of the project. Key achievements include:</p><p>1.)           The empowerment of people living with dementia – including opportunities for civic participation, social inclusion and peer support through the Southern Dementia Advisory Group and other project activities</p><p>2.)           Improved community understanding and increased positive attitudes with regard to the capabilities of people living with dementia. This has been achieved via education sessions (with over 1000 attendances) and the development of new information resources e.g. the ‘Dementia Illawarra’ website (<a href="www.dementiaIS.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">www.dementiaIS.com</a>).</p><p>3.)           Tools to improve the physical environment –including the Dementia Friendly Communities Environmental Assessment Tool (DFC-EAT) and the establishment of the ‘OurPlace’ Kiama mapping tool (http://ourplacemap.com/)</p><p>4.)           Public recognition and acclaim - the project received an Excellence in Community Partnerships Award at the National Disability Awards (2016) and was recognised at the 7th Global Conference for the Alliance of Healthy Cities (2016) by the World Health Organisation.</p><p>5.) The model and tools have informed Dementia Australia’s $3.9 million ‘National Dementia Friendly Communities Strategy’ (funded by the Department of Health, 2017-2021.</p><p>6.) The project has also had an impact at UOW. Programs such as the ‘Dementia Enabling University Strategy’ has increased opportunities for students from all five faculties to study the impact of dementia and consider their role in the creation of a dementia friendly society. The Global Challenges project has also continued to support new interdisciplinary projects that address the societal challenges of dementia.</p><p> </p>

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Business Administration Evaluation of the National Health Care Home Model McLaren, Alex
    Doctor of Business Administration Understanding the impacts of accreditation to the Australian NSQHS standards on quality and safety in public dental services. Powers, John

Outreach Overview


  • Leadership and Management at UOW
    I was Head of Department and Discipline during the 2002 Faculty restructure from Departments into Schools, I have been a member of Senate as well as an active member of University Research and EEO committees.
    I was for 6 years a director of SInet (a university-supported cross-faculty network) and on the steering committee of the inaugural Global Climate Change Week in 2015 (supported by Global Challenges) leading the UOW Sustainability Network
    I have directed the Faculty research centres of ATUL, PandO, and THEORI editing a book (1.1.1) of management theories used by THEORI members with sales over 250. It is used as a textbook in 2 post graduate research methods subjects.
    As a senior woman in a non-traditional area I have been actively recruited for many selection panels.

    Invited speaker at an influential international professional conferences

    My Keynote at ISSD was one of my most influential outputs.  I opened the conference to an audience of around 300 which included, as well as senior academics, members of the Bosnian government and consular officials from many of the neighbouring countries.  My topic included a call to such influential people to take up their responsibly to mitigate climate change.  I went on to describe how IS can contribute to this effort.  After the talk I was approached by many of these officials and politicians who said it had raised their awareness of this issue.  I was also interviewed for the Bosnian national television.

    Advocate for the IS discipline on national or international committees

    Internationally I serve on ISO KM standards committees and lead the AIS Outreach Taskforce

    At the national level, I am on 2 Standards Australia committees (KM and SMES). I co-wrote Build Chapter of the Australian KM standard.  This guides a KM initiative through the complex phases of prototyping and experimenting with new techniques before full implementation.  I also co-wrote the accompanying SME Guide KM.  The Australian KM Standard was a world first in 2005 and now ISO is calling for our input into the International Standard

    Leadership in formal mentoring and related programs/activities

    I have received gratitude from junior women over the years for the inspiration that my position as a woman in non-traditional areas (Physics, Computer Science and IT/IS) has given them.  I am currently a director of the AAIS Committee for the Leoni Warne Prize on Gender Issues in IS.

Education And Training


  • Ph.D. in Information Systems, University of Wollongong, Department of Information Systems 1997 - 2000
  • Graduate Diploma of Business Information Systems in Information Systems, Computer Science 1985 - 1986
  • M.Sc. in Biophysics, Macquarie University, Mathematics and Physics, Research degree 1972 - 1978
  • B.Sc. in Physics, UNSW, Science, Physics Cadet & Prize for top female student 1963 1963 - 1965
  • H.S.C. in Science, Hornsby Girls High School, 7th in State, 5th in Physics 1958 - 1962

Keywords


  • Activity Theory
  • Ageing
  • Complexity Theory
  • Green Information Systems
  • Human Computer Interaction
  • Knowledge Management
  • Management Information Systems

Mailing Address


  • AHSRI, Enterprise 1 Building

    Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Following an early distinguished career in Physics, I became attracted to the evolution of digital technologies and transferred to the discipline of Information Systems (IS) when I moved to Wollongong in 1986.  I am now an internationally recognised senior scholar in IS and the related fields of Knowledge Management (KM) and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Research topics in these 3 fields are interconnected, multidisciplinary, socio-technical and globally important.  In my membership of the Association for Information Systems (AIS), the international body for IS academics, I provide service to the discipline with other leaders in the field, establishing the Special Interest Group in Green IS, chairing the AIS Outreach Task Force  and editing special issues of journals in the AIS basket.

    The discipline of IS encompasses future-focused and fast-moving topics related to the development, use and impact of digital technologies. I have demonstrated expertise in researching topics known as Grand Challenges by taking a holistic investigative approach with innovative theories and methods. As significant citations to many of my papers show, I am internationally recognised as an authority on Activity and Complexity Theories as well as interpretive qualitative methodologies that are appropriate for applying these theories in cross-disciplinary.  I received the VC's Award for Interdisciplinary Research Excellence in 2015 and for Community Engagement in 2017.

    Among the Grand Challenges on which my research projects focusI am known internationally for leadership in the new field of Green IS and for expertise on Strategic Information Systems for Complex Decision Support (my PhD topic). Nationally, I am known for my action research on the use of computers by the elderly to improve their independence and wellbeing. I plan to commercialise this program as a Social Business service to isolated elderly in the community through iAccelerate.

    I have demonstrated expertise in research management bringing in $578,509 in competitive research grants and $192,364 in research consulting. I was lead CI on two ARC Discovery funded projects which involved a partnership with DSTO with impact on the Department of Defence. I also have long standing cooperative engagement with Standards Australia and CSIRO. I have presented seminars and workshops at IS Schools in Australian and in the USA, UK, Germany, Lichtenstein, the Middle East and Asia. I have given Keynotes at 5 national and 1 international conferences.

    I have been employed at UOW for 30 years developing my research impact and leadership capability. Over this time I have positively influenced the careers of 100s of staff whom I have mentored and HDR students whom I have supervised. I continue to work with many former IS staff and students. 10 of my journal articles and 17 conference papers are co-authored with my former HDR students. Some of my 30 completed HDR graduates are now professors themselves at universities in many countries including the Australian G8.  At UOW I am regularly nominated for supervisor of the year and, in 2012, received the VC's award for HDR Supervision Excellence.

     

Selected Publications


Investigator On


Impact Story


  • <p><a href="http://livingconnected.org.au/" title="Living Connected Website" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Living Connected</a> has created a service to improve the digital literacy of older citizens who live in the Illawarra-Shoalhaven.<em>  </em>This service applies the results of four year's research into why and how older people use digital devices and on the benefits to social well-being from this use.</p><p>As developed countries struggle to find suitable living arrangements for their ageing populations, many elderly citizens are becoming increasingly marginalized and isolated. Isolation is known to lead to severe problems such as depression. There is a large body of evidence that remaining active and are major contributors to health and wellbeing of the elderly. With age, the physical capability to get out and about diminishes. Meanwhile, digital technology continues to improve, providing new ways to connect with others and engage in exciting new activities.</p><p>The most recent Telstra report on digital inclusion in Australia reveals that older citizens are missing out on the benefits of the Internet; something that the rest of us take for granted. Government agencies, businesses and community services expect everyone to interact with them online and are making it difficult to access service in personal. This is a real challenge for the digitally excluded.</p><p>The mission of Living Connected is to be a not-for profit community enterprise providing services for the social well-being of elders assisting them to set up and use a computer whereby they remain independent, connected and engaged.  Research into the outcomes of social services has identified eight domains of wellbeing, three of which are on a higher level than the others: maintaining independence, staying connected and being able to engage in meaningful activities. Our research has demonstrated ways by which computers can be used to improve well-being in these domains; maintaining independence by doing banking and other transactions online; connecting with family and friends through email. Skype, and Facebook and spending spare time sdoing an online  course or your familiar history and much more.</p><p>Our research revealed the importance of (1) focussing on 1 or 2 things that each person wants to do. (2) getting the best technology for each person and what they want (3) getting a few 1-on-1 lessons on their own device, just enough to do the one thing they want to do most and (4) having someone they can call on for help when they get stuck.</p><p>Our biggest challenge is to build up a viable and sustainable social business where those who can pay for services but no-one misses out.  We have seed funding from NBNCo and Telstra; help from iAccelerate; and a great team, many of whom are volunteers.</p>
  • <p>Alongside the demographic aging of the population, there is a corresponding increase in the number of people living with dementia. International estimates are 46 million, with this number expected to rise to 138 million by 2050 (ADI, 2016). The increasing prevalence of dementia will demand a shift in both the social and the physical environments within which we live. Low levels of public understanding can contribute to the fear, stigma and social exclusion associated with living with dementia. Public spaces and civic buildings are not often designed in ways which are supportive of people with dementia participating in civic life. ‘Dementia friendly’ communities aim to address this by empowering people with dementia and increasing their social inclusion. They also aim to create more supportive physical environment to enable participation.</p><p>The ‘Dementia Friendly Kiama’ project (led by Dr Lyn Phillipson) and colleagues from UOW (Brennan-Horley, Fleming, Cridland, Hall and Hasan) is a partnership between the University of Wollongong (UOW) Global Challenges Program, the Kiama Municipal Council, the Kiama community and Dementia Australia. The project utilises a Community-based Participatory Action Research framework to inform the development, implementation and evaluation of a multicomponent dementia-friendly community intervention.  Research in Kiama has included interviews and mapping exercises with people with dementia and their carers, community and business surveys, piloting a Dementia-friendly business toolkit and the development of an environmental assessment tool for use in the auditing of public buildings. Formative research activities guided the Action Plan of a local Dementia Alliance and Dementia Advisory Group. Evaluative research activities monitor inputs, outputs, impacts and outcomes of the project. Key achievements include:</p><p>1.)           The empowerment of people living with dementia – including opportunities for civic participation, social inclusion and peer support through the Southern Dementia Advisory Group and other project activities</p><p>2.)           Improved community understanding and increased positive attitudes with regard to the capabilities of people living with dementia. This has been achieved via education sessions (with over 1000 attendances) and the development of new information resources e.g. the ‘Dementia Illawarra’ website (<a href="www.dementiaIS.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">www.dementiaIS.com</a>).</p><p>3.)           Tools to improve the physical environment –including the Dementia Friendly Communities Environmental Assessment Tool (DFC-EAT) and the establishment of the ‘OurPlace’ Kiama mapping tool (http://ourplacemap.com/)</p><p>4.)           Public recognition and acclaim - the project received an Excellence in Community Partnerships Award at the National Disability Awards (2016) and was recognised at the 7th Global Conference for the Alliance of Healthy Cities (2016) by the World Health Organisation.</p><p>5.) The model and tools have informed Dementia Australia’s $3.9 million ‘National Dementia Friendly Communities Strategy’ (funded by the Department of Health, 2017-2021.</p><p>6.) The project has also had an impact at UOW. Programs such as the ‘Dementia Enabling University Strategy’ has increased opportunities for students from all five faculties to study the impact of dementia and consider their role in the creation of a dementia friendly society. The Global Challenges project has also continued to support new interdisciplinary projects that address the societal challenges of dementia.</p><p> </p>

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Business Administration Evaluation of the National Health Care Home Model McLaren, Alex
    Doctor of Business Administration Understanding the impacts of accreditation to the Australian NSQHS standards on quality and safety in public dental services. Powers, John

Outreach Overview


  • Leadership and Management at UOW
    I was Head of Department and Discipline during the 2002 Faculty restructure from Departments into Schools, I have been a member of Senate as well as an active member of University Research and EEO committees.
    I was for 6 years a director of SInet (a university-supported cross-faculty network) and on the steering committee of the inaugural Global Climate Change Week in 2015 (supported by Global Challenges) leading the UOW Sustainability Network
    I have directed the Faculty research centres of ATUL, PandO, and THEORI editing a book (1.1.1) of management theories used by THEORI members with sales over 250. It is used as a textbook in 2 post graduate research methods subjects.
    As a senior woman in a non-traditional area I have been actively recruited for many selection panels.

    Invited speaker at an influential international professional conferences

    My Keynote at ISSD was one of my most influential outputs.  I opened the conference to an audience of around 300 which included, as well as senior academics, members of the Bosnian government and consular officials from many of the neighbouring countries.  My topic included a call to such influential people to take up their responsibly to mitigate climate change.  I went on to describe how IS can contribute to this effort.  After the talk I was approached by many of these officials and politicians who said it had raised their awareness of this issue.  I was also interviewed for the Bosnian national television.

    Advocate for the IS discipline on national or international committees

    Internationally I serve on ISO KM standards committees and lead the AIS Outreach Taskforce

    At the national level, I am on 2 Standards Australia committees (KM and SMES). I co-wrote Build Chapter of the Australian KM standard.  This guides a KM initiative through the complex phases of prototyping and experimenting with new techniques before full implementation.  I also co-wrote the accompanying SME Guide KM.  The Australian KM Standard was a world first in 2005 and now ISO is calling for our input into the International Standard

    Leadership in formal mentoring and related programs/activities

    I have received gratitude from junior women over the years for the inspiration that my position as a woman in non-traditional areas (Physics, Computer Science and IT/IS) has given them.  I am currently a director of the AAIS Committee for the Leoni Warne Prize on Gender Issues in IS.

Education And Training


  • Ph.D. in Information Systems, University of Wollongong, Department of Information Systems 1997 - 2000
  • Graduate Diploma of Business Information Systems in Information Systems, Computer Science 1985 - 1986
  • M.Sc. in Biophysics, Macquarie University, Mathematics and Physics, Research degree 1972 - 1978
  • B.Sc. in Physics, UNSW, Science, Physics Cadet & Prize for top female student 1963 1963 - 1965
  • H.S.C. in Science, Hornsby Girls High School, 7th in State, 5th in Physics 1958 - 1962

Keywords


  • Activity Theory
  • Ageing
  • Complexity Theory
  • Green Information Systems
  • Human Computer Interaction
  • Knowledge Management
  • Management Information Systems

Mailing Address


  • AHSRI, Enterprise 1 Building

    Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

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