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Carbon dioxide sequestration 3.7 billion years ago and the oldest climate cycles

Grant


Scheme


  • Discovery Projects

Abstract


  • In the present day Earth, massive CO2 sequestration in carbonate sediments generates a modest greenhouse atmosphere, creating an equitable climate for life. In the early Earth, carbonate sediments were already being deposited in ice-free oceans. Why then, with the 30-25% cooler early sun, was Earth not frozen over? Was CO2 not the most important greenhouse gas, or did limited expanses of continental crust and shallow marine settings limit the CO2 sequestration? These questions will be resolved by integrated mineralogical and novel geochemical studies on the world¿s best collection of oldest sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The results will yield the deepest-time perspective on Earth¿s changing climate feedback loops.

Date/time Interval


  • 2012 - 2015

Sponsor Award Id


  • DP120100273

Local Award Id


  • 101460

Scheme


  • Discovery Projects

Abstract


  • In the present day Earth, massive CO2 sequestration in carbonate sediments generates a modest greenhouse atmosphere, creating an equitable climate for life. In the early Earth, carbonate sediments were already being deposited in ice-free oceans. Why then, with the 30-25% cooler early sun, was Earth not frozen over? Was CO2 not the most important greenhouse gas, or did limited expanses of continental crust and shallow marine settings limit the CO2 sequestration? These questions will be resolved by integrated mineralogical and novel geochemical studies on the world¿s best collection of oldest sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The results will yield the deepest-time perspective on Earth¿s changing climate feedback loops.

Date/time Interval


  • 2012 - 2015

Sponsor Award Id


  • DP120100273

Local Award Id


  • 101460