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Satne, Glenda Dr.

Senior Lecturer, School of Liberal Arts, Faculty of the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities

Overview


I am a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the School of Liberal Arts.  I specialise in Philosophy of mind and Social Ontology. My research focuses on E- approaches to the Mind and sociality. 
My areas of interest include: Collective Intentionality, Joint action, Social Cognition, the Second-Person, Normativity and the role played by culture in human evolution. I have written on many topics connected to these including: music improvisation, social learning, social bias, evolution and cooperation, social norms, and social attention. I am also interested in Metaphilosophy and Naturalism, and usually write on these topics too. I have written a book on Wittgenstein and I am currently writing one on social normativity.

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • My current research focuses on collective intentionality, i.e. the ways in which groups act, think and feel together. I explore both general interdisciplinary questions concerning the nature of social practices -how do social norms work, how we learn them and when, how they emerged in natural history, etc.-, as well as systematic questions concerning social interaction: What kinds of groups we belong to? How are they formed? Can groups act together 'as one'? When/how groups act (ir)rationally? Are there 'collective subjects' or mere collections of individuals? How are group practices unjust or distorted, including cases of social bias, irrational group behaviour and inter-group hatred.

    My upcoming book (Social Normativity, Routledge) addresses the relation between social interaction and human cognition. The maim claim is that cultural evolution, in the shape of socio-cultural practices, plays a key role in explaining the emergence uniquely human forms of cognition. Associated hypotheses are that several forms of social interaction are possible without entertaining mental representations, and that these inform both the development and evolution of representational practices. Classifying and distinguishing different forms of collective engagement and social interaction is a central task of the book. 

Selected Publications


Presentations


Potential Supervision Topics


  • Collective Intentionality, Collective and Joint action, Social Cognition, Normativity, Intentionality, Naturalism, Wittgenstein

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy The diachronic mind institutionalized: On the role of temporal hierarchies in neurodevelopment Dengso, Mads

Teaching Overview


  • UOW - School of Humanities and Social Inquiry

    Subject Coordinator - PHIL 234 - Mind, Body and the World
    Subject Coordinator - PHIL 236 - Philosophy in Film and Literature
    Subject Coordinator - PHIL 318 - Stories of our Lives
    Subject Coordinator - PHIL 328 - Philosophy at Work

Keywords


  • Collective Intentionality
  • Enactivism
  • Normativity
  • Social Cognition
  • Social Interaction

Full Name


  • Glenda Lucila Satne

Mailing Address


  • University of Wollongong

    Building 19, Room 1089

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2512

    Australia

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • My current research focuses on collective intentionality, i.e. the ways in which groups act, think and feel together. I explore both general interdisciplinary questions concerning the nature of social practices -how do social norms work, how we learn them and when, how they emerged in natural history, etc.-, as well as systematic questions concerning social interaction: What kinds of groups we belong to? How are they formed? Can groups act together 'as one'? When/how groups act (ir)rationally? Are there 'collective subjects' or mere collections of individuals? How are group practices unjust or distorted, including cases of social bias, irrational group behaviour and inter-group hatred.

    My upcoming book (Social Normativity, Routledge) addresses the relation between social interaction and human cognition. The maim claim is that cultural evolution, in the shape of socio-cultural practices, plays a key role in explaining the emergence uniquely human forms of cognition. Associated hypotheses are that several forms of social interaction are possible without entertaining mental representations, and that these inform both the development and evolution of representational practices. Classifying and distinguishing different forms of collective engagement and social interaction is a central task of the book. 

Selected Publications


Presentations


Potential Supervision Topics


  • Collective Intentionality, Collective and Joint action, Social Cognition, Normativity, Intentionality, Naturalism, Wittgenstein

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy The diachronic mind institutionalized: On the role of temporal hierarchies in neurodevelopment Dengso, Mads

Teaching Overview


  • UOW - School of Humanities and Social Inquiry

    Subject Coordinator - PHIL 234 - Mind, Body and the World
    Subject Coordinator - PHIL 236 - Philosophy in Film and Literature
    Subject Coordinator - PHIL 318 - Stories of our Lives
    Subject Coordinator - PHIL 328 - Philosophy at Work

Keywords


  • Collective Intentionality
  • Enactivism
  • Normativity
  • Social Cognition
  • Social Interaction

Full Name


  • Glenda Lucila Satne

Mailing Address


  • University of Wollongong

    Building 19, Room 1089

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2512

    Australia

Research Areas