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Carlson, Bronwyn Associate Professor

Faculty Member

  • Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts
  • School of Humanities and Social Inquiry

Top Publications


    Year Title
    2013 The ‘new frontier’: Emergent Indigenous identities and social media
    2013 Indigenous studies and the politics of language
    Published in   Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice
    2014 Four scholars speak to navigating the complexities of naming in Indigenous studies
    Published in   The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education

Selected Publications


Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Indigeneity And The Representation Of Transgender Formations
    Doctor of Philosophy Weaving the Past into the Future: The Continuity of Yuin and Dharawal Cultural Practices
    Doctor of Philosophy Pathways into History: Experiencing the Aboriginal Past and Present on the Bundian Way Stewart, Jodie
    Doctor of Philosophy Folk Devils And Colonial Crusaders: The Northern Territory Intervention And The Pathologising Of Aboriginal Men In Contemporary Australia Kampers, David

Teaching Overview


  • I am responsible for the coordination and teaching of both of the Indigenous Studies first year subjects, INDS150 Introduction to Indigenous Australia and INDS130 Indigenous Knowledge in a Global Context.  As is the case with most Indigenous Studies programs in Australia, the majority of our students are non-Indigenous from a wide range of geographic locations and cultural backgrounds. A significant number of those enrolled in our subjects are study abroad students who have little or no knowledge of Indigenous Australia.  In order to meet the diverse needs and interests of the students enrolled in Indigenous Studies the learning and teaching frameworks I have employed take into consideration how Indigenous knowledge interacts with western knowledge systems. My disciplinary background is in both Sociology and Aboriginal Studies and I draw from these scholarly traditions to equip students with a reading of the Indigenous landscape that is challenging and produces critical thinkers.  While  Indigenous Studies is anchored in the experiences of Indigenous peoples in Australia, we are in the process of enriching our curriculum with a stronger emphasis on international Indigenous research and perspectives. This involves an explicit recognition that Indigenous Studies students need to be equipped with an understanding of the interconnectedness of the regional, national and global issues confronting Indigenous communities.     

Full Name


  • Associate Professor B Carlson

Top Publications


    Year Title
    2013 The ‘new frontier’: Emergent Indigenous identities and social media
    2013 Indigenous studies and the politics of language
    Published in   Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice
    2014 Four scholars speak to navigating the complexities of naming in Indigenous studies
    Published in   The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education

Selected Publications


Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Indigeneity And The Representation Of Transgender Formations
    Doctor of Philosophy Weaving the Past into the Future: The Continuity of Yuin and Dharawal Cultural Practices
    Doctor of Philosophy Pathways into History: Experiencing the Aboriginal Past and Present on the Bundian Way Stewart, Jodie
    Doctor of Philosophy Folk Devils And Colonial Crusaders: The Northern Territory Intervention And The Pathologising Of Aboriginal Men In Contemporary Australia Kampers, David

Teaching Overview


  • I am responsible for the coordination and teaching of both of the Indigenous Studies first year subjects, INDS150 Introduction to Indigenous Australia and INDS130 Indigenous Knowledge in a Global Context.  As is the case with most Indigenous Studies programs in Australia, the majority of our students are non-Indigenous from a wide range of geographic locations and cultural backgrounds. A significant number of those enrolled in our subjects are study abroad students who have little or no knowledge of Indigenous Australia.  In order to meet the diverse needs and interests of the students enrolled in Indigenous Studies the learning and teaching frameworks I have employed take into consideration how Indigenous knowledge interacts with western knowledge systems. My disciplinary background is in both Sociology and Aboriginal Studies and I draw from these scholarly traditions to equip students with a reading of the Indigenous landscape that is challenging and produces critical thinkers.  While  Indigenous Studies is anchored in the experiences of Indigenous peoples in Australia, we are in the process of enriching our curriculum with a stronger emphasis on international Indigenous research and perspectives. This involves an explicit recognition that Indigenous Studies students need to be equipped with an understanding of the interconnectedness of the regional, national and global issues confronting Indigenous communities.     

Full Name


  • Associate Professor B Carlson