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Monaghan, Brian J. Professor

Professor

  • Coordinator - Pyrometallurgical Research Group
  • School of Mechanical, Materials & Mechatronics Engineering
  • Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences
  • Director - Engineering Materials Research Centre
  • Program D Leader of Sustainable Steelmaking - ARC Australian Steel Manufacturing Research Hub

Overview


Professor Brian Monaghan has been an active lecturer and researcher in materials engineering at the University of Wollongong (UOW) for more than 10 years.He is a pyrometallurgist who believes passionately that if the sustainability, energy, and greenhouse gas challenges currently facing the planet are to be addressed, we need strong engagement from the engineering and scientific communities. His expertise lies in the kinetics and thermodynamics of high temperature metals processing. He is the Director of the Engineering Materials Strength at UOW as well as leader of the UOW PYRO Group. Within the Steel Research Hub (SRH), he is a member of the Research Management Committee, providing leadership to the Sustainable Steel Manufacturing Program, as well as being actively involved in several projects, including:

Obtaining Value from Steel Plant Waste
The effect of Ti on the kinetics of phosphorous removal during BOS steelmaking
Effect of Retained BOS Slag on Refractory Wear
Professor Monaghan is also involved in a number of other external funded research projects.These include:

  • 3D Characterization of Coke
  • Gaseous Iron Reduction
  • Effect of Slag Structure on Interfacial Tension
  • Phosphorous Partitioning in Slags
  • CaO/Al2O3 Ratio Effects on Interfacial Tension of Slags
  • Evaluation of the Productivity Limits in the Blast Furnace Lower Zone

Top Publications


Available for Collaborative Projects

Selected Publications


Potential Supervision Topics


  • Phosphorous and Iron Recovery from Steelmaking Slag for Effective Recycling

    Phosphorous (P) is one of the most detrimental impurities in steel, decreasing its low-temperature toughness. Changing ore grades in Australia with increasing P content, are placing a substantial proportion of these ore products at a competitive disadvantage. To reduce higher price penalties for high P ores, a new treatment methodology is required whereby more P is removed from steel plant streams.

    Effective removal of P directly from iron ores (e.g. beneficiation, high temperature roasting, leaching) has, to this point, proven to be impractical or very difficult. P removal is thermodynamically unfavourable in blast furnace ironmaking and has to be removed from the iron (hot metal) through hot metal pre-treatment and steelmaking processes. The slags produced in these latter processes are high in P and cannot readily be recycled, hence, the research focus has shifted towards (1) lowering the level of P in steelmaking material streams, thereby allowing higher rates of recycling within the steel plant; and (2) the production of a P-rich slag which could potentially be utilised externally, such as in the agricultural area.

    This project aims to understand the underlying principles that control P partitioning in slags.

     

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Effect of Retained BOS Slag on Refectory Wear (PhD4)
    Doctor of Philosophy High Temperature Processing of New Zealand Titanomagnetite Ironsand Prabowo, Sigit
    Doctor of Philosophy High Temperature processing of New Zealand Ironsand Zhang, Ao
    Doctor of Philosophy Phase Evolution during Irons and Reduction Bjaereborn, Oscar
    Doctor of Philosophy Recycling of Steel by Means of Spontaneous Combustion Berry, Matthew

Awards And Honors


Keywords


  • interfacial tension, inclusions, coke, coke analogue
    dephosphorization

Top Publications


Selected Publications


Potential Supervision Topics


  • Phosphorous and Iron Recovery from Steelmaking Slag for Effective Recycling

    Phosphorous (P) is one of the most detrimental impurities in steel, decreasing its low-temperature toughness. Changing ore grades in Australia with increasing P content, are placing a substantial proportion of these ore products at a competitive disadvantage. To reduce higher price penalties for high P ores, a new treatment methodology is required whereby more P is removed from steel plant streams.

    Effective removal of P directly from iron ores (e.g. beneficiation, high temperature roasting, leaching) has, to this point, proven to be impractical or very difficult. P removal is thermodynamically unfavourable in blast furnace ironmaking and has to be removed from the iron (hot metal) through hot metal pre-treatment and steelmaking processes. The slags produced in these latter processes are high in P and cannot readily be recycled, hence, the research focus has shifted towards (1) lowering the level of P in steelmaking material streams, thereby allowing higher rates of recycling within the steel plant; and (2) the production of a P-rich slag which could potentially be utilised externally, such as in the agricultural area.

    This project aims to understand the underlying principles that control P partitioning in slags.

     

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Effect of Retained BOS Slag on Refectory Wear (PhD4)
    Doctor of Philosophy High Temperature Processing of New Zealand Titanomagnetite Ironsand Prabowo, Sigit
    Doctor of Philosophy High Temperature processing of New Zealand Ironsand Zhang, Ao
    Doctor of Philosophy Phase Evolution during Irons and Reduction Bjaereborn, Oscar
    Doctor of Philosophy Recycling of Steel by Means of Spontaneous Combustion Berry, Matthew

Awards And Honors


Keywords


  • interfacial tension, inclusions, coke, coke analogue
    dephosphorization

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