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Arjomandi, Amir Dr.

Head of Postgraduate Studies (HPS)

  • Senior Lecturer - Economics Discipline, School of Buisness, Faculty of Business and Law
  • Fellow - Wollongong Academy for Tertiary Teaching and Learning Excellence (WATTLE)
  • Co-Director - Centre for Contemporary Australasian Business and Economics Studies (CCABES)

Overview


Dr Amir Arjomandi is a Senior Lecturer in Economics and the Head of Postgraduate Studies (HPS) at the School of Business and the Australian Health Services Research Institute (AHSRI). He is also a founding member and Co-Director of the Centre for Contemporary Australasian Business and Economics Studies (CCABES). His research interests include Applied Economics, Empirical Finance, Efficiency and Productivity Analysis, Green Economy and Sustainable Transport. Dr Arjomandi's publications have appeared in leading journals such as Transportation Research Part A, Transportation Research Part E, and Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money. He has received regional and national funding for various teaching and research projects and his works have been cited by esteemed media outlets, industry representatives and the Australian Parliament (Senate reports). Dr Arjomandi has supervised six PhD students to completion and received the Faculty's Outstanding Contributions to Teaching and Learning (OCTAL) Award for his commitment to student achievement and scholarship.

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Amir's research interests include:

    • Applied Economics
    • Efficiency and Productivity Analysis
    • Environmental Economics
    • Empirical Finance

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • The greater Illawarra regional economy is undergoing major structural transformation. This is occurring from its traditional activities in primary and manufacturing industries towards the services sector (e.g. property and business services, health and community services, education, finance and insurance, wholesale and retail trade, transport, communications and tourism) and to knowledge and skill intensive manufacturing. Many of these growth sectors involve knowledge and skill intensive high value adding activities. This transformation will only be successful if there is a matching of labour force skills with the needs of employers, particularly knowledge workers, as well as a pool of innovative entrepreneurs with the capacity to take advantage of rapidly developing market opportunities in the regional, state, national and international markets. At this point in time it is pertinent to take stock of the region’s capabilities in both of these areas. This study, however, only focuses upon the latter. In the so-called knowledge economy of today, knowledge generation and innovation based activity (through R&D expenditure) and its wider dissemination that results incommercialisable products and services is a critical source of regional and national competitiveness. Entrepreneurial activity is pivotal to this process, being the conduit through which the commercialisation opportunity from regional knowledge and innovation oriented activity can be identified and activated. The greater the extent of entrepreneurial activity generated in this context the broader the extent of knowledge and innovation spill-overs and benefit to regional and national economies. In this context, this study reviews and profiles regional entrepreneurs with the aim of identifying how well-prepared they are for the challenges that lie ahead. This has been conducted by means of a survey of Illawarra Business Chamber members, comprising predominantly small and medium sized businesses, and case studies of small and medium sized businesses. <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/346932511_Identifying_entrepreneur_characteristics_and_attributes_in_relation_to_small_and_medium_sized_enterprises_in_a_regional_context_A_case_study_of_the_greater_Illawarra_region" title="Report prepared for the Illawarra Business Chamber" target="_blank" rel="noopener"></a>
  • Motivated by uncertainties caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, this study examines how office vacancy ratios (for premium, A, B, C and D-grade spaces) in Australia respond to shocks in global and local economic uncertainties. Using semiannual data from 1998 to 2020 and applying the vector autoregression (VAR) model, our results suggest that office vacancy ratios respond positively to economic uncertainty shocks in general, and especially to local economic uncertainty. Moreover, our sub-class analyses show that vacancy ratios in various office spaces respond differently to uncertainty shocks. The office vacancy ratio in premium-grade office responds to both shocks after one year with its responses fading out in year three. B-grade and C-grade vacancy ratios respond to both shocks within the first year and responses last for about 4 years. Additionally, sub-lease vacancy ratios in the aggregate office space show quick responses to uncertainty shocks (dying out in 2 years), while direct vacancy ratios respond after about 1 year (but fading out in 3 years).
  • The purpose of this study is to explain the potential long-term impacts of working from home on housing wealth inequality in large cities of advanced <a target="_blank">economies</a>. Based on the provided analyses, the authors argue that due to the unique <a target="_blank">nature</a> of the COVID-19 crisis, it can have a different and long-term impact on housing wealth inequality. Changes in the working arrangements of many professionals will change the housing demand dynamic across different suburbs and may lead to a reduction of the housing wealth gap in the long term. In this paper, the authors propose five mechanisms that may impact housing wealth inequality. Research limitations/implications Long-term data is required to test the proposed conceptual model in this study and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on housing wealth across and within suburbs of large cities. Practical implications Policymakers and regulators may benefit from the discussions and suggestions provided in this study and consider the proposed avenues on how new changes in the working environment (remote working) may result in a reduction of housing wealth inequality. Originality/value This study presents a new perspective about the potential long-term impacts of working from home that is posed by the COVID-19 pandemic on housing wealth inequality in large cities of developed <a target="_blank">economies</a>.

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Interest Rate Parity, Monetary Policy Rule and Remittance in a Least Developed Economy: The case of Nepal Wardhani, Gusti
    Doctor of Philosophy Investigating Endogeneity and The Impact of Corporate Goverenance on The Growth-Profit Trade-Off in The Airline Industry Maung, Yun

Reviewer Of


Keywords


  • Applied Economics; Efficiency and Productivity Analysis; Environmental Economics; Empirical Finance.

Full Name


  • Dr. Amir Arjomandi

Mailing Address


  • School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, UOW

    Northfields Ave

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

Located In Facility


Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Amir's research interests include:

    • Applied Economics
    • Efficiency and Productivity Analysis
    • Environmental Economics
    • Empirical Finance

Selected Publications


Impact Story


  • The greater Illawarra regional economy is undergoing major structural transformation. This is occurring from its traditional activities in primary and manufacturing industries towards the services sector (e.g. property and business services, health and community services, education, finance and insurance, wholesale and retail trade, transport, communications and tourism) and to knowledge and skill intensive manufacturing. Many of these growth sectors involve knowledge and skill intensive high value adding activities. This transformation will only be successful if there is a matching of labour force skills with the needs of employers, particularly knowledge workers, as well as a pool of innovative entrepreneurs with the capacity to take advantage of rapidly developing market opportunities in the regional, state, national and international markets. At this point in time it is pertinent to take stock of the region’s capabilities in both of these areas. This study, however, only focuses upon the latter. In the so-called knowledge economy of today, knowledge generation and innovation based activity (through R&D expenditure) and its wider dissemination that results incommercialisable products and services is a critical source of regional and national competitiveness. Entrepreneurial activity is pivotal to this process, being the conduit through which the commercialisation opportunity from regional knowledge and innovation oriented activity can be identified and activated. The greater the extent of entrepreneurial activity generated in this context the broader the extent of knowledge and innovation spill-overs and benefit to regional and national economies. In this context, this study reviews and profiles regional entrepreneurs with the aim of identifying how well-prepared they are for the challenges that lie ahead. This has been conducted by means of a survey of Illawarra Business Chamber members, comprising predominantly small and medium sized businesses, and case studies of small and medium sized businesses. <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/346932511_Identifying_entrepreneur_characteristics_and_attributes_in_relation_to_small_and_medium_sized_enterprises_in_a_regional_context_A_case_study_of_the_greater_Illawarra_region" title="Report prepared for the Illawarra Business Chamber" target="_blank" rel="noopener"></a>
  • Motivated by uncertainties caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, this study examines how office vacancy ratios (for premium, A, B, C and D-grade spaces) in Australia respond to shocks in global and local economic uncertainties. Using semiannual data from 1998 to 2020 and applying the vector autoregression (VAR) model, our results suggest that office vacancy ratios respond positively to economic uncertainty shocks in general, and especially to local economic uncertainty. Moreover, our sub-class analyses show that vacancy ratios in various office spaces respond differently to uncertainty shocks. The office vacancy ratio in premium-grade office responds to both shocks after one year with its responses fading out in year three. B-grade and C-grade vacancy ratios respond to both shocks within the first year and responses last for about 4 years. Additionally, sub-lease vacancy ratios in the aggregate office space show quick responses to uncertainty shocks (dying out in 2 years), while direct vacancy ratios respond after about 1 year (but fading out in 3 years).
  • The purpose of this study is to explain the potential long-term impacts of working from home on housing wealth inequality in large cities of advanced <a target="_blank">economies</a>. Based on the provided analyses, the authors argue that due to the unique <a target="_blank">nature</a> of the COVID-19 crisis, it can have a different and long-term impact on housing wealth inequality. Changes in the working arrangements of many professionals will change the housing demand dynamic across different suburbs and may lead to a reduction of the housing wealth gap in the long term. In this paper, the authors propose five mechanisms that may impact housing wealth inequality. Research limitations/implications Long-term data is required to test the proposed conceptual model in this study and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on housing wealth across and within suburbs of large cities. Practical implications Policymakers and regulators may benefit from the discussions and suggestions provided in this study and consider the proposed avenues on how new changes in the working environment (remote working) may result in a reduction of housing wealth inequality. Originality/value This study presents a new perspective about the potential long-term impacts of working from home that is posed by the COVID-19 pandemic on housing wealth inequality in large cities of developed <a target="_blank">economies</a>.

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Interest Rate Parity, Monetary Policy Rule and Remittance in a Least Developed Economy: The case of Nepal Wardhani, Gusti
    Doctor of Philosophy Investigating Endogeneity and The Impact of Corporate Goverenance on The Growth-Profit Trade-Off in The Airline Industry Maung, Yun

Reviewer Of


Keywords


  • Applied Economics; Efficiency and Productivity Analysis; Environmental Economics; Empirical Finance.

Full Name


  • Dr. Amir Arjomandi

Mailing Address


  • School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, UOW

    Northfields Ave

    Wollongong

    NSW

    2522

    Australia

Located In Facility