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Jones, Alison L. Prof

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Health and Communities) & Executive Dean

  • Executive Dean - University of Wollongong 2013 -
  • Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Health and Communities) - University of Wollongong 2017 -

Overview


My research focus is on collaboratively addressing current and future anticipated clinical toxicology and public health challenges, both nationally and internationally. We seek to create evidence that changes clinical practice and health policy and in particular to improve outcomes for those with social or clinical disadvantage.

Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Research outputs are in the pharmacology, toxicology and public health domains.  My research leadership supports younger researchers to develop their research potential and to make a difference.

Available as Research Supervisor

Available for Collaborative Projects

Selected Publications


Investigator On


Impact Story


  • <p>Given the potential for serious health impacts to exposed workers, just how efficient is respiratory protection against acute and chronic chemical agents?</p><p>Current research being undertaken by Jane Whitelaw and PhD Candidate Kerrie Burton  builds on her 30-year industry and standards development experience and previous research into the efficiency of such respiratory protection.</p><p>In the latest series of studies, exposure to diesel particulate matter (DPM) is examined. DPM is a major issue in many industrial workplaces including the potential to develop lung cancer and adverse irritant and cardiovascular effects.</p><p>Personal respiratory protective devices are an accepted safety measure to mitigate worker exposure against the potentially damaging health impacts of DPM.</p><p>To be protective, they need to act as effective filters against carbon and other particulates. In Australia, the filtering efficiency of respiratory protective devices is determined by challenging test filter media with aerosolised sodium chloride to determine penetration at designated flow rates.</p><p>However, testing of respiratory protective devices does not account for the differences between characteristics of workplace contaminants like DPM and the test agent sodium chloride, taking into account structure, composition, and particle size.</p><p>Studies to date suggest that the testing methodology specified for certification of personal respiratory protective devices by Standards Australia may not ensure adequate protection for respirator users against DPM under all circumstances of diesel generated particles.</p><p>Funding sources for the project have included the Coal Services Health and Safety Trust and WorkCover Authority of NSW. Partners in the project are Safety Equipment Australia, Coal Services and ERP Engineering.</p>

Available as Research Supervisor

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Evaluation of the Physiological physiological effects of negative pressure respirator use in a work environment Whitelaw, Jane
    Doctor of Philosophy Do As/NZS respiratory protection standards for filter penetration ensure worker health is protected against nanoparticle sized diesel particulate matter? Burton, Kerrie

Located In Facility


Top Publications


Research Overview


  • Research outputs are in the pharmacology, toxicology and public health domains.  My research leadership supports younger researchers to develop their research potential and to make a difference.

Selected Publications


Investigator On


Impact Story


  • <p>Given the potential for serious health impacts to exposed workers, just how efficient is respiratory protection against acute and chronic chemical agents?</p><p>Current research being undertaken by Jane Whitelaw and PhD Candidate Kerrie Burton  builds on her 30-year industry and standards development experience and previous research into the efficiency of such respiratory protection.</p><p>In the latest series of studies, exposure to diesel particulate matter (DPM) is examined. DPM is a major issue in many industrial workplaces including the potential to develop lung cancer and adverse irritant and cardiovascular effects.</p><p>Personal respiratory protective devices are an accepted safety measure to mitigate worker exposure against the potentially damaging health impacts of DPM.</p><p>To be protective, they need to act as effective filters against carbon and other particulates. In Australia, the filtering efficiency of respiratory protective devices is determined by challenging test filter media with aerosolised sodium chloride to determine penetration at designated flow rates.</p><p>However, testing of respiratory protective devices does not account for the differences between characteristics of workplace contaminants like DPM and the test agent sodium chloride, taking into account structure, composition, and particle size.</p><p>Studies to date suggest that the testing methodology specified for certification of personal respiratory protective devices by Standards Australia may not ensure adequate protection for respirator users against DPM under all circumstances of diesel generated particles.</p><p>Funding sources for the project have included the Coal Services Health and Safety Trust and WorkCover Authority of NSW. Partners in the project are Safety Equipment Australia, Coal Services and ERP Engineering.</p>

Advisees


  • Graduate Advising Relationship

    Degree Research Title Advisee
    Doctor of Philosophy Evaluation of the Physiological physiological effects of negative pressure respirator use in a work environment Whitelaw, Jane
    Doctor of Philosophy Do As/NZS respiratory protection standards for filter penetration ensure worker health is protected against nanoparticle sized diesel particulate matter? Burton, Kerrie

Located In Facility


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